A Tale of Transformation the Journey to Entrepreneur

By Graham, Stedman | Success, October 2009 | Go to article overview

A Tale of Transformation the Journey to Entrepreneur


Graham, Stedman, Success


Webster's dictionary defines an entrepreneur as someone who organizes, manages and assumes the risks of a business or enterprise. Yet, is being an entrepreneur any riskier than relying on the traditional corporate structure for jobs, compensation or security? In today's economy, an entrepreneurial spirit is not an option--it is a necessity.

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Today, entrepreneurs create new businesses and jobs at an incredible rate. About 600,000 to 800,000 businesses are started in the United States each year. About 5-15 percent of this country's businesses create the majority of new jobs. With layoffs and companies going out of business, you can no longer count on having a job--but you can create your own. Without jobs, there is less productivity, a lower tax base and less stable economies. With its promise of autonomy, unlimited earnings and high potential, entrepreneurship is a hallmark of the American economic system. Entrepreneurs are the source of new knowledge capital, ideas, social networks and global enterprise in existing and emerging markets.

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At no other time in history have we the need--or better opportunity--for people to create or retain ownership of their lives and financial futures. We are living through times of great challenge and change. It is time for each of us to be the leaders of our lives, to claim our rights as human beings. Communities and our nation need more entrepreneurs. Entrepreneurialism is not only a pathway to autonomy and financial independence, but it has a macro-level impact of generating businesses serving as engines for community development and economic growth, as well as sources of employment opportunities and higher living standards. Entrepreneurship is also a force for community health and well-being, and self-sufficient people.

The transformation to entrepreneur includes finding the freedom that comes from having a strong identity--a strong sense of self. As you know, most of us take years to discover who we really are. Too many of us never will. If we fail to define ourselves, we risk letting others define us--by race, gender, culture and environment. When we buy into labels that keep us in a box, we can never realize our greatest potential. Unrealized potential impacts our families, children, workplaces, communities and the future of America itself. These challenges are cross-generational and cross-cultural. In difficult times, we need to know who we really are--individually and collectively.

History will show this as a transitional age--an age of human reform. As bad as things have been, this time of great turmoil and change presents a huge opportunity to retool and rebuild--from within. While some view the world as crumbling around them, others see a chance for a new beginning. In many senses, we are freer than ever to imagine our possibilities. In this setting, we have a unique chance to identify ourselves based on our talents and dreams, instead of letting the world slap a label on us. More than ever, we need fresh talent, innovative thinking and the spirit of, the entrepreneur to begin this journey of human reform.

There is no security in what is no longer relevant. But there is power in change. John F. Kennedy said, "Change is the law of life. And those who look only to the past or present are certain to miss the future."

Rising from the Tumult

As the world undergoes this seismic shift, what better time is there to become your own leader or business owner--and to aspire to the excellence that may have eluded you in your professional and personal life? What better time is there to move beyond your problems and work toward what you want to become? What better time is there to learn how to focus on your own strengths, learn your greater purpose and start assembling your passport to freedom?

You must answer the questions: What do I do now? …

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A Tale of Transformation the Journey to Entrepreneur
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