Emissions Trading? I Beg Your Indulgence

By Smith, Gar | Earth Island Journal, Autumn 2009 | Go to article overview

Emissions Trading? I Beg Your Indulgence


Smith, Gar, Earth Island Journal


The ancient Roman Catholic doctrine of "indulgences" has been born again in the 21st century. The once popular practice allowed rich parishioners to purchase "remission" for their sins by making contributions to the church's minions. The Council of Trent tried to outlaw the practice in 1562. In June 2009, the US Congress resurrected the concept of conscience-clearing as a key portion of the American Clean Energy and Security Act.

Instead of requiring polluters to implement costly emission reductions of climate-warming gases, "the art of political compromise" produced a "market-based solution" that allows industrial sinners to keep on spewing as long as they acquire pollution indulgences--beg pardon, "pollution credits"--from cleaner, greener operators. Congress's new cap-and-trade scam would put the Church's indulgence scheme to shame. President Obama originally proposed auctioning "permits to pollute" to fund a Green Tech revolution. Congress, in its wisdom, decided to give away 85 percent of these credits to the biggest polluters for free.

The problem with cap-and-trade schemes is that they don't work. Instead of paying for a solution, purchasers are just buying time. In the 1990s, the Clean Air Act introduced a cap-and-trade plan to control the lake-kilting "acid rain" caused by Midwest power plants. Utility owners reaped huge profits but the lakes remained acidified. In its first three years, the European Union's Emissions Trading Scheme failed to reduce emissions--but it did generate soaring electricity bills and a $1.7 billion windfall for British utilities. Why? Because the widespread availability of free "pollution credits" left industries no incentive to reduce emissions. Cap-and-trade plans prompt polluters to rejoice and toss their caps in the air. Why? Because, with a fistful of "pollution credits," they can toss their "caps" to the winds.

What would it look like if we applied the medieval logic that underlies the granting of "pollution indulgences" to other aspects of human behavior? A few adaptations of Emissions Trading come to mind:

Admissions Trading: We know politicians lie. With Admissions Trading, politicians would no longer fear having to admit to their fibs: They could continue lying to the public as long as they purchased Truth Credits from Buddhist monks and young children.

Omissions Trading: Did you forget to recycle? Did you forget that vow to eat organic? …

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