Imagination Makes Perfect: European Impressionism Combined with Good Old Fashioned Imagination Defines the Timeless Art of W. Eddie

By Jackson, Holly | Art Business News, August 2009 | Go to article overview

Imagination Makes Perfect: European Impressionism Combined with Good Old Fashioned Imagination Defines the Timeless Art of W. Eddie


Jackson, Holly, Art Business News


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When artist W. Eddie traverses the countryside of European countries like Belgium and France, he witnesses some of the most beautiful landscapes in the world. But when he goes to his canvas, Eddie prefers to use his imagination to perfect the landscapes, adding what Mother Nature might have missed.

"Art is not like taking a photo; a photo is the same as real life, but art can be a little different," Eddie says. "I can put a feeling into my art--I can imagine a little."

Imagination remains a key component of his highly collectable pieces today, and it is only one of the many artistic skills that he developed early on as a child living in Hong Kong. In fact, his first artworks brought the characters he discovered in children's books to life.

"I just loved art when I was young; no one told me, and no one led me," Eddie says. "When I told my father, he did not really agree. [My parents] wanted me to go to college and study something regular. I was not that interested; I only wanted to concentrate on art. I think it's from my heart."

At age 8, Eddie entered the Hong Kong Art Academy and exhibited his unique style several times before he reached his 20s. After graduating, Eddie came to New York, where he studied at the Art Students League. In 1983, the burgeoning artist became the first Chinese winner (and the first non-American to ever place in the top three finalists) of the New York Painting Competition. Satisfied by his success and fulfillment from art, Eddie, now 54, never dreamed of pursuing another career.

"Up to now, I only painted; I never worked another type of job," Eddie says. "After Art Students League, I went to Europe for a while and visited all the museums. After that, I decided I needed to have my own style."

It was outside of his professional training that Eddie discovered his love of Impressionism. The artist traveled across Asia as a teenager, throughout Europe for decades and all over the United States, starting on the East Coast. Although the countryside's beauty called to him, it was within the walls of historic museums that he discovered the Impressionist paintings that solidified his love for the time-honored school of art. Influences from his time spent in Europe also called to his inner style.

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"In school, the professor can only teach you about art, but you have to create it for yourself," Eddie explains. "After school, I traveled, and I learned how to study what I see and how I can transfer that feeling to my paintings--that's why I travel a lot. …

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