The Plague of Pornography

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 21, 2009 | Go to article overview

The Plague of Pornography


Byline: Rebecca Hagelin, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Culture challenge of the week: pornography

No one wants to talk about America's growing addiction to pornography. Certainly not me, but I do quite often because I know it is one of the greatest evils of our time. Like a toxic plague, pornography usage is sweeping our nation and destroying our humanity. Tragically, the largest demographic consuming Internet pornography is children between the ages of 12 and 17. As deadly as pornography is to the innocence and development of our children, it has a stranglehold on millions of adult men, too.

Walk by any magazine stand, and you'll see that although porn is difficult to avoid on the Internet, dirty magazines are still a much sought-after commodity by adult males. While in the airport recently, my heart broke at the sight of so many men spending time between flights thumbing through the pages of soft porn publications like Playboy.

And for crying out loud, they shamelessly do so in their tidy suits in the plain sight of everyone. It will probably shock many of you to hear that these gentlemen's magazines have for years featured photos, cartoons and illustrations of children in sexual situations, including association with adults, animals and sexual assault. So much for soft porn.

When otherwise responsible adults are slaves to the smut, is it any surprise that adolescents are easily addicted when exposed to porn during their hormone-driven years? We have never before raised an entire generation on porn, so we don't know how damaging the far-reaching effects will be.

A recent edition of Salvo Magazine (a publication on which I'm honored to serve as a pro-bono senior editor), titled Silent Bondage, paints a grim picture of the future by outlining the harms we now know our children are currently suffering as a result of their own pornography consumption. Salvo features the work of Judith Reisman and Jill Manning, seasoned experts in the dangers of porn. Their research shows that the images encourage and stimulate anger and aggression in users and causes them to treat other people as objects. …

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