Back to the Future-Or Putting the Creative Back in Writing

By Gibbons, Alan | NATE Classroom, Summer 2009 | Go to article overview

Back to the Future-Or Putting the Creative Back in Writing


Gibbons, Alan, NATE Classroom


[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

A Faerie Tale

By Charlie Alcock

Once upon a time there was a pawnbrokers shop. It lay on the very corner between Capricorn Street and Leeland Street in a sparsely populated corner of London. It wasn't a very big pawnbrokers, and it didn't have much custom. The paint was peeling from the sign at the top-'North's Pawnbrokers'--and the windows were grimy with the polluted air and months of not being scrubbed. Only just visible through the graffiti were the few measly items the most recent items, which had been pawned at least five months ago-an old, coffee-stained teddy bear, a moth-eaten lampshade, a couple of dirty cigarette lighters ...

Wild Thing

By Jake Copson 7NHA

It was in the yard, a navy blue Chevvy. All autumn Adam had been fixing the doors, painting it and getting it ready for the M.O.T. We sat in the Chevvy polishing everywhere and adding the finishing touches. Adam suddenly had a cheeky grin on his face ...

The New Kid in School

By Emily Taylor

The moment the new kid walked through the school gates, some big kids called Hannah and Lauren stared at her and giggled and whispered. The newcomer looked petrified and shaky, she looked slowly at them. Hannah and Lauren walked quickly like a predator catching their prey. That's when the school bell howled across the yard. The students charged and nudged people into school ...

Ring of Destiny

By Luke Richards

Somebody was coming. I squinted into the distance. The person was flying of course. It was Hawkman. Who else could it be? I looked at my ring. Hawkman gave it to me. He looked odd this day, different like he had changed. I expected to see his warm, friendly smile, his golden feathers and his stretched out wings, his long, sharp pointy talons and his razor sharp beak. but he looked different somehow. I jumped back in surprise and horror. My faced turned as white as a ghost as blood drained from my face ...

Sometimes, with the best will in the world, we all slip into lazy thinking. There are times when I have waxed lyrical about the 'good old days' before SATs and national strategies stalked the land and writing lessons were always creative. I should have known better. I started primary school in 1958 and Grammar School in 1964 and I honestly don't remember a golden age. We had selection, sarcasm, corporal punishment and far too much lecturing from the front of the classroom. We had precis and stultifyingly dull learn-by-rote grammar lessons. There is so much that we do better now. Teachers pay far more attention to the interests of the children in their care than they did then. They also work ferociously hard at engaging our youngsters. What is certainly true however, though good practice and creativity were never wholly squeezed out even at the nadir of the tracking and testing culture, is that there has been a very strong tendency in recent years for the teaching of English, especially writing, to become a functional, rather than a creative construct. This was government rather than profession-led. It can be seen in the undeniable dominance of nonfiction in writing lessons and SATs.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

I want to argue robustly for a major change in direction. We have had the abolition of the KS3 SATs, the relaxation of the Literacy Hour and even an Excellence and Enjoyment document. For all that, we are a long way from embracing the kind of comprehensively creative English curriculum we need. I want to concentrate on just one aspect of this: the teaching of creative writing. We have already come a long way on our long journey out of the Gradgrindian functionalism of the National Curriculum's worst excesses. There was a time when even saying the words creative writing was anathema. I should know, I used them once in an interview for one of the early National Literacy Strategy posts before I understood quite what it entailed. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Back to the Future-Or Putting the Creative Back in Writing
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.