A Reagan Shrine in the Sky

By Hammer, Joshua | Newsweek, July 20, 1998 | Go to article overview

A Reagan Shrine in the Sky


Hammer, Joshua, Newsweek


Tending the flame at the Gipper's beloved ranch

IT FEELS AS IF HE NEVER LEFT. WANDERIng through Rancho del Cielo, Ronald Reagan's old retreat in the hills high above Santa Barbara, Calif., a visitor gets the palpable sense of having walked in on a presidency-and a life-in progress: Reagan's polo shirts, jodhpurs and ball caps still hang in the bedroom closet. Nancy's cowboy boots rest against one wall. A Water Pik sits beside the bathroom sink. In the den, there's a quarter-filled jar of aging jelly beans. You half expect the Gipper himself to come through the front door, tuckered out after a long day on the trail.

But that will almost certainly never happen again. Reagan, 87, is cloistered in Bel Air, a victim of Alzheimer's; family friends say that Mrs. Reagan is now the only person he consistently recognizes. Last year the Reagans put Rancho del Cielo ("the Ranch in the Sky") up for sale, and in April the Young America's Foundation, a Virginia-based conservative group funded by GOP donors like the late Henry Salvatori, purchased it for an undisclosed sum. (An early asking price was $5.95 million.) The group plans to turn the 688-acre property in the Santa Ynez Mountains into a rustic shrine, where the grooming of young conservatives will go hand in hand with rugged outdoor activities-a mix of supply side and sidesaddle, thumb-sucking and brush-clearing. "You can't help feeling a different part of President Reagan when you're here," says Marc Short, 28, executive director of the YAF, who moved to Santa Barbara to oversee the project with his wife, Kristen-and who last week gave NEWSWEEK a rare tour. "You sense the man's modesty."

It is a place rich in history. In 1974 the then Governor Reagan's friend Bill Wilson located the property for Ronnie and Nancy. After 1980, Rancho del Cielo became President Reagan's retreat from Washington; he and Nancy spent about 345 days on the ranch during the White House years. Protected by a 100-man Secret Service detail, Reagan entertained Margaret Thatcher, Queen Elizabeth II and Mikhail Gorbachev here and used the round wooden picnic table out front to sign Reaganomics into law in 1981. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Reagan Shrine in the Sky
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.