Education: Are You Going to Make the Right Choice?

Daily Examiner (Grafton, Australia), October 20, 2009 | Go to article overview

Education: Are You Going to Make the Right Choice?


Byline: Ashleigh O'Connor

SINGLE sex versus co-education schooling. A debate that has swayed back and forth for the past 50 years. Take into account that in Australia if your choice of education is private it will be more than likely be a single sex school, the opposite for a public school.

Advocates of single sex education continually argue that boys and girls have varied needs and require different styles of teaching to learn to their full potential.

Single sex education has obvious advantages for girls. It opens up educational opportunities in non traditional courses such as mathematics or science. Single sex schools often provide strong female role models and the students are therefore encouraged to exercise leadership. There is less pressure during adolescence when girls are more prone to suffer from low self esteem. More focus is given to girls in sporting pursuits which might not be as prominent in a co-ed environment.

Boys are often out performed by girls. This sometimes causes boys to withdraw from some curriculum areas. In addition to this there is some indication that in co-ed classrooms either boys or girls can be discriminated against according to the subject, the gender of the teacher and the teaching technique.

In an Australian study incorporating 270,000 students, Ken Rowe concluded that on average both girls and boys performed 15 to 22 percentile points higher on standardised tests while attending a single sex school.

Research has shown major psychological differences in even pre-adolescent boys and girls. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Education: Are You Going to Make the Right Choice?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.