Studies in Accounting History: Tradition and Innovation for the Twenty-First Century

By Rezaee, Zabihollah | Atlantic Economic Journal, June 1998 | Go to article overview

Studies in Accounting History: Tradition and Innovation for the Twenty-First Century


Rezaee, Zabihollah, Atlantic Economic Journal


Introduction

The history of accounting is fragmented into different patterns and frameworks. A variety of approaches has been used to describe the evolution of accounting in terms of the relevance given to accounting theory and practice in different historical periods. However, very little is known regarding the relationship between accounting and economic histories. Accounting techniques typically create a framework within which economic and business events can be measured, recognized, and reported. The intent of this article is to relate economic history to the evolution of accounting. An attempt is made to integrate accounting techniques of various periods (particularly the earlier ones) to economic developments. This is done by reviewing the book entitled, Studies in Accounting History: Tradition and Innovation for the Twenty-First Century, by describing the evolution of accounting from an economic perspective and by discussing economic reality and the consequences of accounting theory and practice presented in the book.

Co-editors Tsuji and Garner compiled 13 selected papers of the 50 articles presented at the Sixth World Congress of Accounting Historians held in Kyoto, Japan, in August 1992. The book is a collective wealth of articles on the historical perspective of accounting and public policy, strategic management accounting practices, financial accounting, and the development of CPAs in a number of countries. In publishing this book, the authors' objective is to "further promote accounting history attention in all of its aspects in the decade ahead" [p. xi]. The book presents the main themes of the Kyoto Congress - bridging the gap between tradition and innovation in accounting theories and practices and the growth of accounting history research and publication in several countries.

Although not formally divided into sections, the articles lend themselves to three groupings. The first consists of two articles on historical perspectives of accounting, public policy, and the accounting profession. The next comprises four articles on the evolution of cost and management accounting. The final group - the real heart of the book - includes seven articles on the historical development of financial accounting. After a brief review of the first two groups of papers related to public policy and cost accounting, this article attempts to describe the evolution of financial reporting in response to changes in economic, political, and social environments.

Public Policy

The articles on historical perspectives of accounting as they relate to public policy and the accounting profession are "Accounting History and Public Policy," by Gary John Previts and "The Development of the Certified Public Accountant System in the People's Republic of China," by Xu Zheng-dan. Previts' article describes the historical interactions between professional accountants and public policymakers and the implications of those interactions for public decision making today. He argues that accounting historians can contribute to the knowledge and understanding of how and why public policy differences exist in a variety of economic systems by studying the evolution of public policy and relating accounting standards to business operation, investment, and reporting activities. He suggests that accounting historians take a proactive role in addressing the global interdependence of capital market systems and assist in forming an agenda for developing a global public policy for the accounting profession.

Previts concludes that practicing CPAs have placed the accounting profession in the center of public policy by virtue of performing attestation services including taxation, governmental, and not-for-profit accounting services as well as self-regulation through quality control and peer reviews. He encourages more historical examination to increase understanding of the relationship between accounting and public policy. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Studies in Accounting History: Tradition and Innovation for the Twenty-First Century
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.