Collective Bargaining Agreements: Safety and Health Provisions

By Gray, George R.; Myers, Donald W. et al. | Monthly Labor Review, May 1998 | Go to article overview

Collective Bargaining Agreements: Safety and Health Provisions


Gray, George R., Myers, Donald W., Myers, Phyllis S., Monthly Labor Review


Union cooperation on matters of safety and health, the establishment of a joint local labor-management safety and health committee, protective clothing, and safety "dos and don'ts" are the most frequently appearing subjects in 744 private-sector collective bargaining agreements expiring between August 1997 and July 2007

Safety and health issues are a major concern today for both employers and union representatives. The cost of workers compensation and health care benefits, the long-tailed effect of exposure to health hazards, the premature loss of future years of employment, and the prevention of human suffering are some of the reasons for this concern. Collective bargaining negotiations are potential arenas for the exploration, discussion, and formalization of philosophies, intentions, and procedures regarding safety and health matters. However, the actual extent to which these matters are examined in contemporary collective bargaining agreements is unknown, Accordingly, this article investigates the prevalence and types of safety and health provisions included in the current collective bargaining agreements of large private-sector U.S. firms.

Previous research

A 1976 study examined the prevalence of 26 safety- and health-related subjects in 1,724 major collective bargaining agreements covering 1,000 or more workers and maintained in a file by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.(1) The contracts covered 7.9 million workers, or about one-half of all workers who were included in collective bargaining agreements in the industries studied. The contracts were in effect during mid-1974, with most of them remaining in effect in 1975 and beyond.

The safety and health subjects analyzed in the 1976 study were (1) general policy statements; (2) union-management cooperation; (3) dissemination of safety rules and procedures; (4) dissemination of information to unions; (5) safety and health committees; (6) employer compliance with safety requirements; (7) employee compliance with safety requirements; (8) employee discipline for noncompliance with safety rules; (9) safety and health inspections; (10) work performed under unsafe conditions; (11) final authority in safety disputes; (12) safety equipment; (13) safe tools, equipment, and transportation; (14) crew size and working in isolation; (15) types of safety protection; (16) protection against noxious gases or dust; (17) sanitation, housekeeping, and personal hygiene; (18) provisions for physical examinations; (19) alcohol and drugs; (20) accident procedures; (21) first aid and hospital facilities; (22) personnel assigned to treat injuries; (23) compensation for job-related injuries (excluding workers' compensation), vacation, holiday, and other payments not available to, or in addition to, those available to employees with non-occupational disabilities; (24) leave and transfer rights of disabled workers; and (25) pay differentials for hazardous duty.

In addition to these 25 subjects, some ancillary subjects related to them were also examined in the study. Information on the ancillary subjects was somewhat more detailed than that on the broader subjects to which they were related. For example, ancillary subjects studied in the area of safety and health committees were eligibility for committee membership, the term of service on the committee, the frequency of committee meetings, and compensation of committee members

Of the 1,724 agreements that were reviewed, 1,607, or 93 percent, contained one or more of the 26 safety and health subjects that appeared in the 1976 study. The most prevalent subject in the agreements was compensation for injuries, which was included in 60 percent of the contracts. The other subjects appearing most frequently in the agreements were safety equipment (49 percent); employee compliance with safety requirements (46 percent); union-management cooperation (43 percent); sanitation, housekeeping, and personal hygiene (40 percent); and employer compliance with safety requirements (33 percent). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Collective Bargaining Agreements: Safety and Health Provisions
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.