A View with a Room: The Navajo Nation Opens a Sleek Hotel in the Southwest's Iconic Monument Valley

By Collins, Andrew | The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine), September 2009 | Go to article overview

A View with a Room: The Navajo Nation Opens a Sleek Hotel in the Southwest's Iconic Monument Valley


Collins, Andrew, The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine)


[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

IMMORTALIZED IN SUCH classic Hollywood films as The Searchers and Easy Rider, the breathtakingly vast landscape of sandstone-studded monoliths known as Monument Valley stretches across windswept miles of northeastern Arizona and southeastern Utah. Its base elevation of a mile above sea level and its arid, sunny climate ensure optimal conditions for avid shutterbugs, who rejoiced last winter with the opening of the View Hotel (MonumentValleyView.com). Now visitors to this sparsely populated valley, where the Navajo people have lived for more than a millennium, can awaken any morning of the year from a restful night's sleep inside a comfy, contemporary hotel room and behold one of the world's most captivating vistas from a private balcony.

Armanda Ortega, a member of the Navajo clan Kiy'annii (Towering House), owns and operates this low-slung stucco hotel, which adjoins the recently reconstructed visitor center and trading post on the Utah side of the 90,000-acre Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park. From nearly every room--as well as the airy, high-ceilinged restaurant-you're treated to striking panoramic views of Monument Valley's legendary formations, including the Mittens, a pair of 1,000-foot red rock towers that frame the landscape as you gaze northeast. Step outside and you have direct access to the three-mile Wildcat hiking trail as well as a 17-mile self-guided driving loop along a bumpy dirt track; a four-wheel-drive vehicle is best, although not required, for this adventure. (With no rentals available near Monument Valley, you'll have to bring your own.)

Just about every space inside the ecoconsciously designed hotel is optimized to take advantage of the surroundings. Even the views from the exercise room and the handful of units facing west are jaw-dropping, especially at sunset, and the lone elevator has a small window, lest you go even a moment without admiring the setting. At night Monument Valley's rich copper, ocher, and crimson hues give way to a jet-black sky dappled with brilliantly twinkling stars--light pollution is nil in this part of the world.

The live-and-let-live Navajo Nation's mystical environs have long been a popular getaway among same-sex couples seeking romance, spiritual enrichment, and tranquility. It's hard to imagine a more alluring spot for a restorative retreat than this upscale yet low-key hotel, whose 96 rooms come with carved-wood furnishings, plush beds with Navajo spreads, and a few requisite modern conveniences (you don't have to use the free Wi-Fi and flat-screen TV, but it's nice to know they're there). The best viewing entertainment, of course, lies right outside your window.

A Foray Into The Four Corners

Mostly people-free but populated with mesmerizing high-desert scenery and iconic national parks, the Four Corners region encompasses some of the best road-tripping terrain in America. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

A View with a Room: The Navajo Nation Opens a Sleek Hotel in the Southwest's Iconic Monument Valley
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.