Coroner Slams Hospital for Failure to Spot Meningitis; Criticism for Medics after Death of 10-Year-Old Who Was Sent Home

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), October 23, 2009 | Go to article overview

Coroner Slams Hospital for Failure to Spot Meningitis; Criticism for Medics after Death of 10-Year-Old Who Was Sent Home


Byline: Rod Minchin

A HOSPITAL was criticised by a coroner yesterday for failing to spot that a 10-year-old boy was gravely ill, later dying from meningitis.

William Cressey died from the brain condition a day after he had been sent home from Darlington Memorial Hospital.

The inquest heard that when the schoolboy returned to the hospital and was in a lot of pain he begged one doctor: "Please help me - if you don't help me, I'm going to die."

Yet the desperate youngster was refused antibiotics until it was too late and eventually suffered a massive seizure, slipping into a coma from which he never recovered.

Newcastle Coroner David Mitford recorded a narrative verdict. He said William's death was due to: "Natural causes to which a delay in giving antibiotic treatment for meningitis may have contributed."

Mr Mitford said it was a "reasonable decision" for doctors to have admitted William to the hospital on February 27, 2005, to observe his condition.

"Meningitis was considered and discounted by consultants involved after examination the following morning.

" It was felt that there was no evidence to lead to the conclusion, at that time, that this was a case of meningitis," he said.

"If he was well, he could be sent home later in the day. This was a reasonable decision."

The coroner said meningitis had been considered and rejected by doctors and he was "not satisfied" on the evidence given that there was sufficient evidence to form a diagnosis of meningitis.

Mr Mitford said that William's mother, Cheryl Cressey, was emotional and upset at her son's ill health and her evidence - which was very critical of the hospital's care to her son - has become "coloured by her emotions and consequently is exaggerated".

Mr Mitford went on to criticise the hospital for the way it observed William during that day.

He said: "The evidence of that observation in the notes is startlingly inadequate - there being no narrative detail whatsoever and only one entry in the temperature chart and three entries of pain killers being administered during that day.

"The evidence of qualified nursing observation during the afternoon was unsatisfactory and it seems any observation undertaken had been left to auxiliaries and went unrecorded and unreported."

Mrs Cressey was too upset to speak after the inquest but released a statement through her Manchester-based law firm, Pannone. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Coroner Slams Hospital for Failure to Spot Meningitis; Criticism for Medics after Death of 10-Year-Old Who Was Sent Home
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.