Network, Network, Network

American Libraries, August 1998 | Go to article overview

Network, Network, Network


A lot of moxie and a little luck brought the 70,000-volume Lenox (Mass.) Library Association some $125,000 closer to its $2-million capital-campaign goal on May 23. On that evening, some 1,000 people paid $45-$100 per seat to attend a library benefit performance by Bill Cosby. Not only did the renowned comedian appear gratis, he even auctioned off a sweatshirt that he personally designed for the occasion. Why? Because the library asked.

"We have stepped out of the mold several times," Development Assistant Lisa Berkel told American Libraries. Two years earlier, jazz musicians John Lewis and Wynton Marsalis had also given a concert in the library's behalf, thanks to Lewis's acquaintance with a library Friend who owned a nightclub at which he sometimes taught music.

Admittedly, the library also had a "remote connection" to Cosby -- namely that Berkel's police-chief husband knew his professional counterpart in the nearby western Massachusetts town where Cosby owns a home. Through that connection, Berkel and her colleagues delivered Cosby an open-ended, over-the-transom invitation in June 1997 to appear at Tanglewood's prestigious Ozawa Hall, which donates its space to nonprofit gigs for a nominal fee.

In October, one of Cosby's assistants contacted the library for details. At that point, Berkel asked Lewis and Marsalis to write a recommendation letter "so Cosby would know we weren't an organization that should stick to bake sales." The rest is fiscal history: Officials have now raised some $1.325 million toward renovating and refurbishing the historic 1815 facility.

To Berkel, the moral of the story is that "You reach, and the worst that will happen is, someone will say no."

Courting Collections

Librarians in New York and elsewhere who may understandably feel fiscally slam-dunked when budget-wielding officials seem intent on diverting public dollars to sports-arena projects (AL, June/ July, p. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Network, Network, Network
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.