Postponements, Referrals, Routines Outpace Actions

By Kniffel, Leonard | American Libraries, August 1998 | Go to article overview

Postponements, Referrals, Routines Outpace Actions


Kniffel, Leonard, American Libraries


What had promised to be an agenda fraught with debate over issues such as education for librarianship and ALA's relationship with the Boy Scouts of America became instead three sessions devoted largely to routine reports, referrals, and postponements. ALA Council met June 28, 30, and July 1, during the Association's Annual Conference in Washington, D.C., but forswore extensive debate and adjourned without completing its agenda.

The cautious mood of Council has gradually deepened over the last several years, following the sting of the so-called Israeli Resolution, which was rescinded in 1993 when councilors realized that, passed in a frenzy, it had become a diplomatic and public relations nightmare (AL, July/August 1993, p. 618). This year's actions -- or lack of them -- indicate an unwillingness to lunge into controversy without the benefit of committee analysis and due process.

There was no shortage, however, of ceremony and actions in the area of legislation (CD#20.5-9). Council proceedings began with a June 28 appearance by Rep. Major Owens (D-N.Y.), the only librarian in the U.S. Congress. It being his birthday, Owens was presented with a huge cake, which was served to councilors and spectators.

Welcoming Council to the nation's capital, Owens gave an impassioned speech in support of the threatened e-rate for libraries and schools, urging the Association to "rally the children of America" in a "counterattack on the greedy and misguided" who want to deprive educational institutions of the telecommunications discounts. He called the e-rate "as important as the G.I. Bill or the Morrill Act to establish land-grant colleges."

A ubiquitous flier from the ALA Washington Office circulated throughout the conference asking attendees to urge their legislators -- in visits to congressional offices and by phoning the Capitol switchboard and talking to members of Congress -- to protect the e-rate and fair use and "respect local decision-making on Internet access policies."

By consent, Council adopted a resolution in support of the universal service provisions of the Telecommunications Act (CD#49).

Patricia Wand, chair of the Committee on Legislation, presented three resolutions that were swiftly approved by consent. A resolution (CD#20.6) "in support of the vitality of fair use in the digital age" resolves that ALA "remain committed to working closely and cooperatively with members of Congress and their staff, and representatives of all affected industries and constituencies, in pursuit of WIPO treaty implementation legislation which, in equal measure, protects copyrighted information and permits its continued fair and other lawful use in the digital environment to no less an extent than that permitted under current law."

A resolution (CD#20.7) "commending the U.S. Congress for language in the 1999 Defense Authorization bill prohibiting the closing of libraries on military installations and one (CD#20.8) commending the Library of Congress for its "extraordinary support" of the Annual Conference in Washington passed by consent, as did a motion from the floor supporting the minting of a Library of Congress coin in honor of LC's bicentennial next year.

Loving the `L' word cautiously

Councilor Ruth Gordon moved (CD#54) that whereas the competencies needed for many specialized areas -- children's services, young adult services, reference, cataloging, school librarianship -- are being short-changed or totally ignored in many graduate programs," ALA's Committee on Accreditation and an advisory task force be charged with revising the 1992 Standards for Accreditation to include "mandating courses in the special fields." She also moved that the standards include the statement: "ALA accredits master's degree programs designed to prepare students for careers in librarianship.'

"I come from a state [California] where we can't buy a school librarian, a children's librarian, a reference librarian, a cataloger . …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Postponements, Referrals, Routines Outpace Actions
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.