United Nations Day

Manila Bulletin, October 23, 2009 | Go to article overview

United Nations Day


The United Nations (UN) is an international organization founded in 1945 after the World War II by 51 countries committed to the following objectives: Maintaining international peace and security; developing friendly relations among nations; and promoting social progress, better living standards, and human rights. The organization has, over the years, taken effective action on a wide range of issues and has served as a forum for its 192 member states to express their views, through the General Assembly, the Security Council, the Economic and Social Council, and other bodies and committees.At this point, one cannot imagine, or would not want to even think about, the possibility of another global armed conflict on the scale of the first and second World Wars. This is an indicator of the strength or success of the United Nations. While there are many episodes of conflict that lamentably have happened in many countries in the world, these conflict situations have been contained and resolved through the intervention of the United Nations or, more specifically, its agencies. By providing a venue for states to discuss issues or mechanisms to resolve disputes through diplomacy, the United Nations has not only survived the Cold War; it has also created an atmosphere warm enough to propel constant dialogue among leaders, among differing faith traditions and ideological groups.More than deterring or resolving conflict, the United Nations has become an effective venue to develop consensus among the leaders of independent nation-states on a range of development concerns. …

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United Nations Day
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