Reality Behind His Empty Rhetoric; Analysis

Daily Mail (London), October 24, 2009 | Go to article overview

Reality Behind His Empty Rhetoric; Analysis


Byline: Edward Heathcoat Amory

NICK GRIFFIN made a series of controversial and unsubstantiated claims on Question Time. Here we examine the reality behind the rhetoric.

RHETORIC: 'I am not a Nazi and never have been ... I am the most loathed man in Britain in the eyes of Britain's Nazis and they loathe me because I have brought the BNP from being frankly an anti-Semitic and racist organisation.'

REALITY: Mr Griffin has been quite open about his approach to the BNP, which is to make it more popular by making its headline policies less extreme - and that includes the Nazi connection. As he has said, 'Yes, Adolf went a bit too far. His legacy is the biggest problem that the British nationalist movement has to deal with. It just creates a bad image.' But there is no evidence that he has changed his own views since the days when he read Mein Kampf at the age of 13, and described himself as a National Socialist.

RHETORIC: 'Our immigration policy is supported by 84 per cent of the British people at present.'

REALITY: The BNP's immigration policy is voluntary repatriation of 'immigrants' (ie non-whites) regardless of whether they were born here. There is no evidence that any but a tiny minority of British people support such a plan. Mr Griffin himself recently suggested that if there was a problem working out where to send immigrants back to, he would 'drop them out of a plane somewhere over Africa'.

RHETORIC: 'I said that Churchill would belong to the BNP because no other party would have him, for what he said in the early days of mass immigration to this country, for the fact that, quote, "they are only coming for our bene-fit system", for the fact that in his younger days he was extremely critical about the dangers of fundamentalist Islam in a way that would now be described as Islamophobic.'

REALITY: Papers released by the National Archives show that when he was prime minister in the Fifties, Churchill and the rest of his cabinet were concerned about immigration from the Caribbean and whether the immigrants were being drawn in by our benefit system. …

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