Growing Alloys Firm's Pounds 1.5m Sales Boost Bid

The Birmingham Post (England), October 27, 2009 | Go to article overview

Growing Alloys Firm's Pounds 1.5m Sales Boost Bid


Byline: GRAEMEBROWN

More than 15 jobs have been retained after a manufacturer moved to a new premises in Staffordshire as part of expansion plans.

Langley Alloys, which makes high strength corrosion resistant materials, has moved into a new 22,000 sq ft site at Centre 500, in Newcastle-under-Lyme, and is already setting its sights on increasing the workforce to 20 and adding pounds 1.5 million in annual sales.

More than pounds 500,000 has been invested into the relocation, which more than doubles capacity, increases its processing and provides a modern working environment for employees and customers alike.

The move, which was aided by support from InStaffs and Advantage West Midlands, will also allow the firm to take its innovative and high quality range of materials even further into the oil and gas sector, marine and offshore industries and power generation where it is used to clean flue gases.

Richard Shacklady, Chairman of Langley Alloys, said: "This latest development marks the next stage in our history and highlights just how far we have come since we were acquired by Meighs Castings of Stoke back in 1996 after the business went into receivership.

"The then owner John Halliday saw the potential and incubated Langley as a division of the castings operation and, under the leadership of his son Chris, the firm grew turnover from a modest pounds 500,000 a year to pounds 4 million by 2005.

"By the end of 2006, Langley's growth track was such that we made Meighs Castings a subsidiary of the re-incorporated Langley Alloys Limited and in mid 2008 divested the Meighs Castings Bronze foundry business to MetalTek Corporation, a large USA castings operation. …

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