Just Rewards


Despite their bad press, bonuses are an important way to motivate marketers.

Bonuses are back in the spotlight after analysts recently suggested that bankers' payouts would rocket by 50% this year. The public outrage associated with such rewards made them synonymous with the worst excesses of capitalism.

However, despite being brought into disrepute by greedy City bankers, bonuses have long been part of many marketers' remuneration packages at companies from P&G and Unilever to HSBC, eBay, Audi and O2. For those companies that offer them, bonuses have proved an effective way to motivate their marketing teams.

Yet, in contrast to bankers, many marketers have found their bonuses shrinking over the past year.

Marketers received an average bonus of pounds 2500 this year, down from pounds 3000 in 2008, according to a survey of 1300 companies carried out by the Chartered Institute of Marketing (CIM) and Croner Reward in May and June. The maximum bonus potentially available to marketers also fell, from pounds 4500 to pounds 4000. Nonetheless, while the percentage of basic salary awarded as a bonus fell from 9.4% last year to 8%, the proportion of marketing directors and marketing managers receiving a bonus was up 5% and 2% respectively.

Part of the reason for the slump is obvious. If a company runs a bonus scheme, rewards are generally paid out to all staff across the organisation and are directly linked to company income.

As profits have tumbled in the wake of the economic crisis, so bonus payments have, naturally, followed suit.

As an HSBC spokesman puts it: 'If profitability is down, marketers' bonuses will be too, although there is always a need to reward performance.'

Marketers face an additional challenge: bonuses are often tied to their individual performance, the direct impact of their role on company profits and how far they have met personal objectives.

In the current economic climate, such targets can prove elusive and proof of a marketers' direct impact difficult to quantify.

One senior brand manager at a top FMCG company says: 'While bonus structures have remained the same, the goalposts have shifted. For many marketers, objectives were set before the recession kicked in. With many marketing budgets now slashed, these targets have become impossible to meet. Marketers are therefore falling short and missing out on their full bonuses. These workers will have a much bigger fight on their hands this year to get the bonuses they deserve. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Just Rewards
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.