The Politics of Sudan

By Goldstone, Richard; Hostetler, Courtney et al. | Proceedings of the Annual Meeting-American Society of International Law, Annual 2008 | Go to article overview

The Politics of Sudan


Goldstone, Richard, Hostetler, Courtney, Small, Jason, Proceedings of the Annual Meeting-American Society of International Law


This panel was convened at 10:45 a.m., Thursday, April 10, by its moderator, Adrien Wing of the University of Iowa College of Law, who introduced the panelists: Justice Richard Goldstone, formerly of the Constitutional Court of South Africa; Courtney Hostetler of the Sudan Divestment Task Force; and Jason Small of the U.S. State Department.

INTRODUCTORY REMARKS BY ADRIEN WING *

It should be noted that this is one of two panels hosted by the Africa Interest group this year. As a former Chair of that group, I am very pleased to state that it is under the able leadership of Cornell law professor Chantal Thomas and Utah law professor Erika George. Our topic, "The Politics of the Sudan," is very timely. Darfur is now often synonymous with genocide. Yet the international community's response to atrocities there and in other parts of Sudan has been less than overwhelming. We have a wonderful panel to address this and a variety of issues concerning Sudan, including: to what extent have regional and international politics constrained responses to the crisis? What is the effect of Sudan's oil reserves? What role does politics in the United States play, and what will be the effect of municipal initiatives on the federal government's actions?

As the principal organizer of this panel, and a member of the Annual Meeting committee, I should also like to note that we tried very conscientiously to get a Sudanese representative from a variety of constituencies to participate, but were ultimately unsuccessful. Our first panelist is a world renowned international lawyer from Africa and very well known to ASIL. Judge Richard Goldstone is a former justice of the South African Constitutional Court and a former prosecutor for the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. He is followed by a representative of the NGO community, Ms. Courtney Hostetler, who is a research analyst for the Sudan Divestment Task Force, which is a project of Genocide Intervention. Finally, we are fortunate to have a representative from the Bush administration, Mr. Jason Small, from the Sudan desk of the U.S. State Department. I would like to acknowledge the absence of our original moderator, Northeastern Law School professor Hope Lewis, who was taken ill and is unable to travel. She is here with us in spirit, and has dedicated her career to human rights issues, including those that relate to Africa.

REMARKS BY JUSTICE RICHARD GOLDSTONE ([dagger])

According to a recent Reuters report, international experts estimate that 200,000 people have died and 2.5 million have been driven from their homes in five years of fighting in Darfur. (1) Despite hand-wringing on the part of world leaders, the violence continues.

It is regrettable and almost inconceivable that an international army will be sent into Sudan to protect the victims of the violations being perpetrated by the Government of Sudan in the Darfur region. The joint United Nations/African Union Peacekeeping force has been unable to operate because of political roadblocks created by the Government of Sudan.

Attempts by the Western members of the Security Council to have it take meaningful steps against the Government of Sudan have been successfully blocked by China, which has a significant investment interest in Sudan and purchases some 60 to 85 percent of Sudan's oil output of 500,000 barrels per day. China would be adamantly opposed to peremptory economic sanctions being imposed against Sudan.

In January 2005, an international inquiry appointed by the UN Secretary-General into the war crimes perpetrated in Darfur reported to the Security Council on the policy of the Sudanese Government to attack, kill and forcibly displace members of some of the tribes living in Darfur. The Commission of Inquiry recommended that the situation be referred by the Security Council to the International Criminal Court (ICC). On March 31, 2006, the Security Council acted on that recommendation and made the suggested reference to the ICC. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Politics of Sudan
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.