Do Heritage Conservation Districts Work? the Case of Kitchener's Upper Doon District

By Kovacs, Jason F.; Shipley, Robert et al. | Canadian Journal of Urban Research, Winter 2008 | Go to article overview

Do Heritage Conservation Districts Work? the Case of Kitchener's Upper Doon District


Kovacs, Jason F., Shipley, Robert, Snyder, Marcie, Canadian Journal of Urban Research


Abstract

Many countries including Canada use the designation of heritage conservation districts as a tool to manage change in historic areas. Designation attempts to provide an orderly way of reviewing potential changes in an effort to ensure the maintenance of historic value. However, there has been some opposition to district designation in Canada, often based on myths and false premises. Those opposing designation view it as restricting property rights and undermining property values. However, research from across North America generally shows a correlation between designation and increased property values. The current study examined the Upper Doon district established in Kitchener, Ontario in 1988. Several questions were asked: has the district achieved its stated goals, how do residents feel about it and what has happened to property values. Results affirm that residents are knowledgeable about the functioning of their district and satisfied. Furthermore, the data show that all applications for changes were approved speedily, and that properties performed above average in the market.

Keywords: heritage, conservation district, property value, Ontario

Resume

Plusieurs pays, incluant le Canada, emploient la designation de district de conservation du patrimoine (DCP) comme outil d'amenagement pour gerer les changements au sein de secteurs historiques. Cependant, il y a eu quelque opposition a la designation de DCP au Canada, plus souvent qu'autrement base sur des mythes et de fausses premisses. Les opposants revendiquent que cette designation impose une limite aux droits eta la valeur de propriete. Neanmoins, les etudes en Amerique du Nord illustrent generalement une correlation entre la designation de district de conservation du patrimoine et une hausse accrue de la valeur de propriete. Notre etude se concentre sur le district Upper Doon de Kitchener, Ontario etablie en 1988. Nous avons adresse plusieurs questions: est-ce que les buts exposes ont ete realise dans le district, qu'elle est la perception des residants au sein du district et quelle ont ete les consequences sur la valeur de propriete. Les resultats demontrent que les residants sont satisfaits et bien informes du fonctionnement et des reglements concernant leur district. En outre, les donnees illustrent que toutes les demandes pour des changements ont ete approuvees rapidement et que la valeur des proprietes est au-dessus de la moyenne du marche.

Mots cles: heritage, district de conservation du patrimoine (DCP), valeur de propriete, Ontario

Introduction

What is a Heritage Conservation District?

There is a long established practice in urban planning of identifying sites and structures of heritage significance (Machacek 2004). The body of practice is perhaps best viewed from the perspective of the World Heritage Convention (WHC) to which Canada and over a hundred other United Nations member states are signatories. The so called Venice Charter of 1964, one of the foundation documents of the WHC, accepted that the definition of a heritage structure applies: "not only to great works of art but also to more modest works of the past which have acquired cultural significance with the passing of time." It also says that this definition "embraces not only the single architectural work but also the urban or rural setting in which is found the evidence of a particular civilization" (ICOMOS).

Under the WHC, signatory states recognize the ongoing threat to sites of historic significance posed not only by natural decay but also from modern development pressures and they undertake to ensure "the identification, protection, conservation, presentation and transmission to future generations of the cultural and natural heritage" (UNESCO 1972). Recognition of heritage sites, therefore, is intended as the first step in their conservation and their retention for the use of future citizens. As a Federal state, the legal expression of Canada's obligation under the WHC fell to the Provinces, and in the 1970s most jurisdictions in Canada adopted Heritage Acts designed to protect heritage sites. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Do Heritage Conservation Districts Work? the Case of Kitchener's Upper Doon District
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.