Pope Art


Two weeks before the opening of Tate Britain's 'Pop Life' exhibition featuring the work of, among others, the 'Pope of Pop' himself, Andy Warhol, a curious item appeared in the Guardian under the banner: 'Pope seeks to frame new relationship with artists.' Reading more like the kind of small ad that usually appears in the personal columns rather than in the editorial pages, it was actually a report about a new initiative launched by the Vatican to forge 'a new and fertile alliance between art and faith' to celebrate the 10th anniversary of Pope John Paul II's 'Letter to Artists' and the 45th anniversary of Pope Paul VI's original initiative in setting up the Vatican Museum's modern religious and contemporary art collection in 1973.

The collection includes works by Auguste Rodin, Wassily Kandinsky, Pablo Picasso and Marc Chagall. Warhol's work is conspicuous by its absence, despite his having been a good Catholic boy who attended mass regularly until his death, and despite his own efforts, recorded in his Diary, to secure a commission to make a portrait of Pope John Paul II. In one entry he notes: 'Hermann-the-German said he's 90% sure that he has the pope for me to do. And the other night at a party Mario D'Urso said, "I've been working on getting the pope for you".' But it was not to be. He and his business manager, Fred Hughes, did eventually secure a brief audience with the Pope in 1980, but there was no private sitting. Instead Warhol had to content himself with silk-screening a found image of the pontiff.

Warhol was not without fans in the church hierarchy, however, as he gleefully reported in his Diary the following year. As a guest of the now disgraced media tycoon, Conrad Black, Warhol had been introduced to a real live cardinal (or rather half of him', since he'd recently suffered a stroke) who remarked that he'd heard that the artist had a nephew who was a priest to which Warhol replied, Oh yes, but he just ran away with a Mexican nun'. Hughes, who was with him, was horrified, but to his credit, the cardinal told him that he admired Warhol's honesty, adding: 'And I love his art and I know he goes to church every Sunday.'

Ironically, the Vatican's wish list now includes Warhol's name, along with those of other 'great 20th-century American artists' such as Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Ad Reinhardt and Clifford Still, as well as Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg, whose inclusion is interesting, given the Vatican's position on homosexuality and the hardline views of the present pope, Benedict XVI, himself. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Pope Art
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.