How Blue-Sky Thinking Leads to a Paradigm Shift; A New Book Has Been Published Highlighting the Array of Management Speak Used in UK Workplaces. Ian Duncan Spoke to the Experts about the Reasons Behind the Rise in Jargon

The Birmingham Post (England), November 5, 2009 | Go to article overview

How Blue-Sky Thinking Leads to a Paradigm Shift; A New Book Has Been Published Highlighting the Array of Management Speak Used in UK Workplaces. Ian Duncan Spoke to the Experts about the Reasons Behind the Rise in Jargon


Help is on hand to ensure business people avoid picking low-hanging fruit and start singing from the same hymn sheet to implement a strategy aimed at delivering a data-related sales initiatives to stimulate the market and drive paradigm shifts.

If none of that makes any sense, you're in luck because a book released last week actually aims to poke fun at ridiculous terms used by managers and business people.

Management Boll**ks brings together a collection of classic black and white photos contrasted with examples of management speak used in modern offices.

They also remind business people to express ideas in non-gender specific language to avoid causing offense.

In one example, a wedding portrait is captioned with: "We take a big picture view of our human capital."

In another, a crying woman is reassured by her lover: "I know our interactive management style has eradicated the need for meetings, but that won't stop us."

Author Richard Havers blames large HR departments and insecure managers for the spread of this language. "They create a quasi-science to legitimise common sense," he said. "Part of the language is to give a sense of superiority or a feeling that you know the secret code. If you know 'management boll**ks' it's like being in the Masons."

But he added: "It's very seductive. I use it all the time. It's taken over the language."

The book might be humorous, but the Plain English Campaign, which promotes clear communication, believes business jargon is a real problem.

A spokeswoman for the campaign said: "Management speak is even worse than most jargon as it doesn't belong to any particular profession and just makes the assumption that everyone understands. …

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