The Iron Age Bling That Would Make You the Torc of the Settlement

Daily Mail (London), November 5, 2009 | Go to article overview

The Iron Age Bling That Would Make You the Torc of the Settlement


Byline: Jonathan Brocklebank

IN our modern age, it may be the top-of-the-range car in the drive or the new conservatory that lets the neighbours know we are doing rather well for ourselves. In the Iron Age, a gold torc around your neck would make the point no less succinctly.

Historians believe the neckbands are proof that even 100-200 years before the birth of Christ, keeping up with the Joneses was a familiar concern.

Indeed, Dr Fraser Hunter, one of Scotland's foremost Iron Age experts, says such ostentatious displays of wealth could be interpreted as the beginnings of the nation's class structure.

'In this period you are starting to see indiperhaps cations there were differences between certain people and many would want to show off their wealth,' he said. 'One of the ways they made out they were different from other people was by their jewellery and the fine textiles they wore.' There is no doubt the torcs would have attracted many admiring or envious glances among the farming folk in Stirlingshire where they were found.

The owner, who would wear a torc only for 'best', would be able to boast that he commissioned a craftsman to make it specially - or even that the torc originated in a far away land.

Not that he would have had any real concept of France at that time. In Scotland, Iron Age people did not even have a concept of their own nation, only of their locality.

But they knew their bling. And their fine clothes. Dr Hunter said there was a widespread misconception that Iron Age folk wore drab, dull clothing, when in fact it was often extremely colourful. It was the boom age of textiles, the finer and more extravagant the better, for that would indicate expense. Jewellery was all the rage - especially bangles, but not brooches, for Iron Age people had not invented the pin. Nor was the buckle in common use, so belts were formed by tying strips of leather or textile.

Most families relied almost entirely on farming for subsistence but some were more prosperous than others, inheriting more fertile tracts of land. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Iron Age Bling That Would Make You the Torc of the Settlement
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.