Tips on Finding a Dream Media Job Bob Geldof's Way

By Snoddy, Raymond | Marketing, August 27, 1998 | Go to article overview

Tips on Finding a Dream Media Job Bob Geldof's Way


Snoddy, Raymond, Marketing


It's a great time for getting new jobs, whether your ambition is to become Russian Prime Minister or a school assistant. Regional newspaper groups, most of which still have to report their financial results, are expected to reveal that classified, and recruitment advertising in particular, is powering ahead. The only people able to detect the recession are economists who have been predicting its arrival for months and therefore have a vested interest in seeing their horse come home.

Classified ads and headhunters, however, have their limitations in getting you the job of your dreams. There is another, albeit high-risk, method for landing one of those rare, desirable jobs that are never advertised - and Bob Geldof has just demonstrated with some panache how it should be done. The method is quite simple, although not everybody can be sure of pulling it off. You have to get yourself invited to give an important speech to the main annual conference of that section of the media in which you are most interested and then you slag off everything and everyone in it. It's called having a vision of the future.

Geldof, you may remember, made his pitch by denouncing "deracinated, half-wit DJs" that fill the airwaves, thereby driving his entire audience in search of a dictionary. What were needed were iconoclasts, madmen, thinkers and talkers, added Geldof. You can picture the comic-strip balloons above the heads of the bosses: "Mmmmm, I wonder." And so it was that Bob accepted 'shiploads' of money to be an iconoclast, madman, thinker and talker on the drive-time shift on Xfm in London. …

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Tips on Finding a Dream Media Job Bob Geldof's Way
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