Is "Bad Boss" a Redundancy?

By Manley, Will | American Libraries, September 1998 | Go to article overview

Is "Bad Boss" a Redundancy?


Manley, Will, American Libraries


Ever since I started writing this column six years ago, a month rarely goes by when I don't get a letter exhorting me to write about bad bosses. In the words of one reader, "You've written about socially dysfunctional catalogers, loopy children's librarians, and psychotic circ clerks, but never bad bosses. Why not?"

The simple answer is that the bad boss is too easy a target. Poking fun at a bad boss is like telling Viagra jokes about Bob Dole. Where's the challenge and what's the point? I wouldn't be saying anything that hasn't been said already. Also, I happen to be a boss, and wouldn't it be a tad hypocritical of me to ridicule my peers while pretending that the jokes don't apply to me? Simply put, people who work in glass offices shouldn't throw insults.

On the other hand, the letters I get from librarians with bad bosses seem to be arriving with greater frequency and increased intensity. One reference librarian writes, "I'm happily married, I have two wonderful children, a loyal dog greets me at the front door every evening, I live in a nice house on a wooded lot, but my life is miserable because I have a bad boss."

That's the bad thing about bad bosses. They can ruin your whole life. Studies show that you spend more time with your boss and your coworkers than you do with your spouse and your children. So in a sense having a bad boss is worse than having a bad spouse, and a really bad boss will not only ruin your work life but will also send you home with a residual headache and high blood pressure.

What are the signs of a bad boss? My readers have given me some clues:

* Has a sign on the office wall that asks, "What part of 'NO' don't you understand?"

* Office hours are posted on the door as "By appointment only (if you've got the guts to do it)."

* Her idea of a compliment is "This was a good day. You only made three mistakes."

* Brags about giving his spouse an annual performance review at anniversary time. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Is "Bad Boss" a Redundancy?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.