Dirty Little Secrets: A Short History of the Christian Coalition

Church & State, September 1998 | Go to article overview

Dirty Little Secrets: A Short History of the Christian Coalition


A few short weeks from now, Christian churches all over America will be asked to distribute voter's guides produced by TV preacher Pat Robertson's Christian Coalition.

Coalition activists will assure pastors that the guides are nonpartisan and purely educational in character, not unlike the Coalition itself. In fact, nothing could be farther from the truth. Here are the facts.

The Christian Coalition was assembled in late 1989 by Robertson from the remains of his failed campaign for the Republican presidential nomination. Because the Virginia Beach broadcaster's run was in the GOP primary, the organization had a Republican slant from its very beginning.

Ralph Reed, the group' s first executive director, quickly pushed the Coalition into direct campaign activity on behalf of conservative Republican candidates. At the 1991 "Road to Victory" Conference in Virginia Beach, Reed boasted of the group's key role in re-electing U.S. Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.) the previous year.

In that closed-door session, Reed said he and Robertson decided to act after they discovered Helms was down by eight points in the polls. "Bottom line is...five days later we put three-quarters of a million voter's guides in churches across the state of North Carolina," observed Reed, "and Jesse Helms was re-elected by 100,000 votes out of 2.2 million cast."

Such electioneering endeavors were no doubt helped by a $64,000 contribution in October 1990 from the Republican Senatorial Committee, a group not known for its nonpartisanship.

During the `90s, the Coalition's political activities continued to metastasize, and its partisan character became more and more apparent. In their book, Dirty Little Secrets, researchers Glenn R. Simpson and Larry J. Sabato examined 193 congressional voter guides issued by the Coalition during the 1994 elections and found a pattern of "manipulations, distortions and outright falsehoods."

"By systematically rigging the content of its voter guides to help Republican candidates...the group had essentially donated hundreds of thousands of dollars (perhaps millions) in free advertising to the Republican Party," observed Simpson and Sabato. (Simpson is a reporter for the conservative Wall Street Journal, while Sabato is a political science professor at the University of Virginia.)

Although the Coalition usually stacks its guides to favor Republicans over Democrats, in a few cases it even unleashes its propaganda efforts within Republican primaries. Former allies are sometimes cast aside, if it suits the purpose of Robertson and company.

In the 1997 GOP attorney general primary in Virginia, for example, Coalition leaders put out guides that favored Mark Earley over Ken Stolle, even though both men were equally in line with Coalition views. …

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