Chip Forelli: Landscape Mysteries

By Kaplan, Morton A. | The World and I, June 1998 | Go to article overview

Chip Forelli: Landscape Mysteries


Kaplan, Morton A., The World and I


Since opening his New York studio in 1982, Chip Forelli has gone on to establish dual reputations as both an insightful art photographer and a savvy commercial tradesman. Of particular note are Forelli's stunning black-and-white landscape images, which home in on the subject's essential mystery and power.

"My personal photographic objective is to acknowledge and celebrate the existence of beauty--it is often found in unexpected or overlooked places and circumstances," notes the photographer. Forelli has indeed searched the world over--the United States, New Zealand, Canada--for landscapes where he can encounter "visual gifts," as he calls them.

"I am an opportunistic photographer. I react to things as they present themselves," he insists, adding: "People have different agendas in their work. Mine is beauty, the provocative, the mysterious, something that causes viewers to go into the scene and explore it themselves." He especially favors images that do not give the viewer "all the answers right away."

Forelli does not include people in his art photography. "If a person is in a scene, he kind of dominates it. There's no room for you if there is someone already in there," he says, half jokingly. However, what does dominate the artist's work is the strong graphic design sense that he imbues in his forms, all of which resonate with meaning. …

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