Clinton in China

The World and I, September 1998 | Go to article overview

Clinton in China


BEIJING SUMMIT

CHINA--U.S. President Clinton's China visit marks another major event in the development of Sino-U.S. relations. The leaders of China and the United States agreed to continue to make greater strides toward the goal of a constructive strategic China-U.S. partnership.

More important, the agreement of the two countries on some issues of world significance, i.e., the Asian financial turmoil and the nuclear and missile races on the South Asian subcontinent, has demonstrated the importance of a healthy, stable China-U.S. relationship. Such a relationship is not only in the interests of China and the United States, but of the world's peace and stability at large.

With the new millennium around the corner, we find ourselves in a historic phase, in which China and the United States shoulder responsibilities for establishing' a peaceful world, allowing all nations on this planet the right to development worthy of human dignity.

China Daily

June 29, 1998

A VISIT OF GREAT IMPORTANCE

CHINA--On the Taiwan issue, Chinese Foreign Minister Tang Jiaxuan said that the United States should take even more concrete actions to implement its commitments. The remaining sanctions on China imposed by the United States after 1989 are no longer significant. In the larger interest of further improvement and expansion of Sino-U.S. relations, Tang thinks that the U.S. government should lift all sanctions imposed on China.

Communist Party

People's Daily

June 24, 1998

CHANGES IN U.S. VIEW OF CHINA

CHINA--Most Americans view China's status in American global strategy to be increasingly important. Both the U.S. government and public have come to realize that the rise of China and the rapid growth of China's national strength cannot be stopped by any external forces, including the United States. The U.S.-China relationship will have ever-greater influence on the strategic interests of both sides.

Secondly, the "China threat theory," which has been trumpeted by some Americans, has now quieted. The U.S. government and public recently assessed China as becoming a "responsible big power." These positive changes in the U.S. government and public view of China are serving as a vital basis for the promotion of the Sino-U.S. relationship.

Renmin Ribao

June 23, 1998

BOOSTING ASIAN-PACIFIC STABILITY

CHINA--Recently some U.S. congressmen launched a fresh attack against their government's China policy--some even called for Clinton to postpone his visit. Obsessed by ideological bias, they regard the Sino-U.S. relationship as a pawn in U.S. political bipartisan struggles. However the visits the two leaders have exchanged have initiated a new type of bilateral relationship. Prospects for Sino-U.S. relations are inspiring.

Guangming Ribao

June 17, 1998

ENHANCING COOPERATION IN HOUSING REFORM

CHINA--U.S. President Clinton said the U.S. and Chinese governments plan to set up a residential housing committee in order to improve Chinese technology in housing construction. He said that cooperation within the committee will help to provide Chinese citizens with more energy-saving and comfortable houses, thus improving the people's living standard.

Renmin Ribao

Haiwaiban

July 2, 1998

CLINTON TRIP A BIG STEP FORWARD

CHINA--Since the Sino-U.S. relationship improves step by step, rather than a "great leap forward," the differences cannot be resolved overnight. It is hoped that Clinton's visit serves as a big step forward in the development of the bilateral relationship.

China Youth

Party Daily

June 16, 1998

SUMMIT HIGHLY PRAISED

CHINA--President Clinton's visit to China turned out to be a great success. His meeting with President Jiang Zemin not only benefits the Asia-Pacific region, but the peace and stability of the world. …

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