Sheffield University

By Farmer, Nicola | History Review, September 1998 | Go to article overview

Sheffield University


Farmer, Nicola, History Review


Sheffield: a city famous for steel, cutlery and snooker, and infamous for its starring role in `The Full Monty' and for being one of the poorest cities in the EEC. OK, so on the surface Sheffield is not the most alluring of places to visit, let alone live in for three years while at University. However, Sheffield has far more to offer than might initially be apparent.

The City

Naturally, there is far more to University life than work, as every well-seasoned student will inform you. Sheffield has an abundance of non-academic distractions. As the fifth largest city in England, whatever you want to do ... you can do it in Sheffield!

Sheffield is justifiably famed for its lively club scene, which caters for every conceivable dance-floor taste. From Reggae to Jazz; from Rave to Soul; from Hard Rock to Grunge, Sheffield has it all! In addition, live music comes in all shapes and sizes. The `state-of-the-art' Sheffield Arena has been voted the UK's premier indoor concert venue for five years running. Only Wembley and Birmingham are able to rival Sheffield in the bid to stage the really big and impressive concerts.

The city also enjoys a thriving cultural life. The Crucible Theatre is well-known for the World Professional Snooker Championship, yet also offers a varied programme of drama, dance, music and shows. The Crucible, combined with the beautifully restored Lyceum Theatre, provides Britain's largest theatre company complex outside London.

For those of you with a sporting bent, the sports facilities in Sheffield are among the finest in Europe. Sport first came to Sheffield in a big way in 1991 when the World Student Games were the catalyst for three major new sports venues: the Don Valley International Athletics Stadium, the Sheffield Arena and Ponds Forge International Sports Centre, with its magnificent swimming, diving and leisure pools. Skiing continues all the year round at Sheffield Ski Village and the city is also the home of two indoor climbing centres and two famous football clubs -- United and Wednesday. The Sheffield Eagles (rugby league), Sheffield Steelers (ice hockey) and Sheffield Sharks (basketball) also operate at the highest level in their own particular sports.

In my opinion, however, regardless of the sporting activities, the cultural dimension, or the night-life of which Sheffield might boast, the city deserves most extensive acclaim for its retail activities! The Meadowhall Shopping Centre is one of the largest in Europe, drawing tourist shoppers from many countries. Sheffield has also retained and enhanced a vibrant city centre. For the more extravagant student, Sheffield might offer more temptation than is sensible.

The University

So, there is nowhere more rewarding than Sheffield if you want to drink, get into the music scene, shop and fulfil the role of being a typical idle and bankrupt student. However, this is not to undermine Sheffield University, which is an academic institution enjoying a distinguished reputation. Recent assessments of both research and teaching quality confirm its status as one of the foremost universities in the United Kingdom. The History Department is one of the finest: this is reflected in its high typical A-level offer, of AAB; in its top rating for research; and in the fact that the Higher Education Funding Council rated its teaching as `excellent'. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Sheffield University
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.