Join the Green Club; Northumbria University Signs Up to Car Club to Tackle City Centre Congestion

Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England), November 10, 2009 | Go to article overview

Join the Green Club; Northumbria University Signs Up to Car Club to Tackle City Centre Congestion


ACAR club scheme which will cut congestion in a city centre has been praised by a clean air organisation.

Northumbria University has signed up to a green car club scheme that means staff can leave their own vehicles at home and use a shared car for work-related errands.

The move has been praised by the Be Air Aware campaign, which is seeking to increase awareness of the issue of poor air quality in Tyne and Wear among private car users, schoolchildren, and businesses.

It means Northumbria University employees will be able to walk, cycle or use public transport to get to work, and still have access to a car if they need to carry out errands during working hours.

Prof Peter Strike, deputy vice-chancellor of Northumbria University, said joining the car club meant there could be less traffic clogging city centre roads during rush hour. He said: "We're really keen that our employees use sustainable transport wherever possible, and joining the car club means more staff will be able to do so.

"Staff will be able to leave their car at home and know that if they have to run an errand that requires a vehicle there is one waiting for them in the car park."

Sally Herbert, Newcastle City Council's travel plan officer, said Northumbria's involvement could cut down the number of cars being brought into the city every day.

She said: "We're thrilled that Northumbria University, one of the largest employers in the city centre, has signed up to the car club scheme.

"There's a strong feeling that people drive their car to work on the off-chance they may need to make a journey during the day. …

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