Re Learning Thru E Learning? (Part 2)

Manila Bulletin, November 11, 2009 | Go to article overview

Re Learning Thru E Learning? (Part 2)


Kids nowadays are most fortunate to have access to a wealth of information via the net. They have tools I never had to work with and aid us through our educational trek. I remember not even being allowed to carry a calculator to school! To top it all, now we have choices. There’s the traditional way of learning of course, where there’s a personal teacher-student relationship and interaction. And then, there’s E Learning. Let’s recap from last time. E-Learning lessons are generally designed to guide students through information or to help students perform in specific tasks. Information based e-Learning content communicates information to the student, just like content that distributes the history or facts related to a service, company, or product. In information-based content, there is no specific skill to be learned. In performance-based content, the lessons build off of a procedural skill in which the student is expected to increase proficiency. Here are some more types of E Learning systems. Web-based training – (WBT) is a kind Web-based training (WBT) is a type of training that is similar to Computer-based training (CBT); however, it is delivered over the Internet making use of a web browser. Web-based training frequently includes interactive methods, such as BBS (electronic bulletin boards), chat rooms, and instant messaging (such as Yahoo, MSN, ICQ and more recently SKYPE) videoconferencing and discussion threads. WBT is usually a self-paced learning medium though some systems allow for online testing and evaluation at specific times. Communication Technology – this is generally categorized as asynchronous or synchronous. Asynchronous activities use technologies such as what’s common nowadays like blogs, wikis and forums or discussion boards. The idea here is that participants may engage in the exchange of ideas or information without the dependency of other participant’s involvement at the same time. Electronic mail (Email) is also asynchronous in such a way that mail can be sent or received without having both the participants’ involvement at the same time. To differentiate this from Synchronous activities which involve the exchange of ideas and information with one or more participants during the same period of time. An online interview, or a face to face conversation or discussion is an example of synchronous communications. Synchronous activities occur with all participants joining in at once, as with an online chat session or a virtual classroom or meeting. Virtual classrooms and meetings can often use a mix of communication technologies. A recent survey has revealed that European lecturers believe that e-learning can significantly strengthen teaching and learning within higher education today. …

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Re Learning Thru E Learning? (Part 2)
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