Amid Big Distractions, Spending Bills Await Actions; 17 Legislative Days Remain

By Shafroth, Frank | Nation's Cities Weekly, September 14, 1998 | Go to article overview

Amid Big Distractions, Spending Bills Await Actions; 17 Legislative Days Remain


Shafroth, Frank, Nation's Cities Weekly


The 105th Congress--transfixed by the special report delivered from the Special Prosecutor about President Clinton last week--has less than 17 legislative days left before its scheduled adjournment. But it has yet to pass and send any of the controversial 13 annual spending bills necessary to keep the federal government operating after October 1.

The combination of the specter of impeachment, the shortness of time to complete action on the hotly disputed annual spending bills, and the commitment of House GOP leaders to enact legislation this session to provide for up to $80 billion in new tax subsidies leaves little room for other priorities and action.

The annual spending bills will determine the fate of the summer jobs program, the local public safety block grant program, the year 2000 census, public housing reform, and disaster mitigation efforts.

The little time left means there will be less time to work out differences and pass NLC-supported bankruptcy or regulatory reform legislation. It means that it will be harder for Congress to pass NLC-opposed efforts on Internet or railroad preemption.

It means this Congress will achieve no progress on adopting a budget or dealing with the looming insolvencies of Social Security and Medicare.

Tax & Budget

With so little time left, House and Senate leaders have dropped efforts to reach agreement on a budget resolution for next year. Instead they are near an agreement to violate last year's Balanced Budget Act and adopt as much as $80 billion in new tax breaks and subsidies over the next five years, mostly focused on the so-called "marriage penalty" and extending expiring tax breaks. Instead of paying for the new federal subsidies with offsetting new revenues or cuts in federal entitlement spending, the leaders are near an agreement to simply borrow the money against what they hope will be a federal budget surplus.

The agreement goes against commitments made by the President and the Senate earlier this year to preserve any surplus unless and until a long-term agreement on social Security solvency is achieved. However, because the agreement is inconsistent with federal budget rules, the tax cuts will require a 60 vote margin in the Senate to pass and go to the President for approval.

Senate Budget Committee Chairman Pete Domenici (RN.M.) signaled possible Senate agreement, but only if the federal surplus is also used "for possible emergency or additional spending" to meet domestic needs. The agreement would seem to rule out proposals by House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) and House Budget Committee Chairman John Kasich (R-Ohio) for new tax subsidies and breaks in excess of $1 trillion.

Internet Taxation

The White House, high tech industry, and some members of the Senate are pressing to move some version of the Internet Tax Freedom Act before this Congress' scheduled adjournment early next month. The Senate, depending upon how Congress moves on the Starr report, has less than 17 legislative days left, during which time it must enact 13 annual appropriations bills, and during which time the GOP clearly intends to pass a tax cut bill. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Amid Big Distractions, Spending Bills Await Actions; 17 Legislative Days Remain
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.