Position Yourself at the Center: Coteaching Reading Comprehension Strategies

By Moreillen, Judi | Teacher Librarian, June 2008 | Go to article overview

Position Yourself at the Center: Coteaching Reading Comprehension Strategies


Moreillen, Judi, Teacher Librarian


THE LITERACY TEAM: ARE YOU AT ITS CENTER?

Teacher-librarians have long been responsible for promoting reading in schools. We carefully collect exciting print and electronic resources to support the curricula taught in our buildings. We give booktalks, invite guest authors and illustrators, and provide teachers with topical and thematic text sets, mini-collections that circulate via the classrooms in our schools. We plaster our library walls and our schools' halls with posters to motivate youth to read. We organize book clubs and book fairs and invite students, teachers, and parents into the wondrous world of literacy. We believe that these promotional activities help create avid readers and we act accordingly.

But if someone were to ask your principal to name the members of your school's literacy team, would you be first on the list? Many of us see our role as fostering the enjoyment and appreciation of literature in all genres and information in all formats-but we have stopped short of taking part in actual reading instruction. Helping youth become capable readers is the goal of every school. Improving students' reading achievement and improving teachers' reading instruction are critical concerns of all school principals. If we are to position ourselves at the center of our schools' literacy programs, then we must become leaders in reading instruction.

If we think in terms of what is important to classroom teachers and administrators, reading is one area of the curriculum that is a priority in every K-12 school. In "What's Hot for 2008," 100% of respondents to the International Reading Association's (IRA) annual survey labeled adolescent literacy, reading comprehension, informational/nonfiction texts, and struggling/striving readers (grade 4 and above) as components of literacy teaching that "should be hot" (Cassidy & Cassidy, 2008, p. 10). Under the umbrella of reading comprehension, educators can successfully address all of the hot topics identified by IRA's literacy survey respondents. These literacy program components are also aligned with the charge of school library programs and offer teacher-librarians entrees into classroom-library collaboration. These are topics that meet the needs of students, our classroom teacher colleagues, and our principals.

For too long, many of us have stood on the periphery of our school's literacy team. Perhaps we worked within a limited concept of teaching reading that focuses on decoding skills. It is true that these skills are best taught by classroom teachers and reading specialists who are trained to teach them and who can monitor the development of each individual learner. But reading also involves using those decoding skills in the service of making meaning. When we teach and coteach reading comprehension strategies, we are helping students make sense of what they read. And we know that if our goal is to teach students to be effective users of ideas and information then we must ensure that they are first and foremost capable readers.

If reading is so important to students, teachers, and administrators, then positioning ourselves at the center of our schools' literacy programs puts teacher-librarians in a prime position to coteach with our classroom teacher colleagues. As teacher-librarian, researcher and educator Ken Haycock has said, people do things for their own reasons. If we want our library programs to function as the hub of learning in our schools, then helping classroom teachers teach reading comprehension strategies and helping principals reach school goals for reading achievement must be at the center of our work.

ALIGNING READING COMPREHENSION STRATEGIES AND INFORMATION LITERACY SKILLS

Research indicates that reading comprehension strategies should be explicitly taught and modeled at all grade levels (Block Pressley, 2002; Pressley, 2006; RAND, 2002; Sweet & Snow, 2003). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Position Yourself at the Center: Coteaching Reading Comprehension Strategies
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.