Resources to Take You through the Summer Break

By Rosenfeld, Esther; Burton, Corinne O. | Teacher Librarian, June 2008 | Go to article overview

Resources to Take You through the Summer Break


Rosenfeld, Esther, Burton, Corinne O., Teacher Librarian


2008 STATE OF AMERICA'S LIBRARIES REPORT

The American Library Association recently issued their State of America's Libraries Report, which states that libraries of all kinds continue to be engines of learning, literacy, and economic development in communities nationwide. Check out the section with commentary on declining funding for school libraries. The report is available at the ALA web site www.ala.org.

TURNING ON THE LIGHT AT SCHOOL

In an article in the March 2008 issue of Educational Leadership, Marc Prensky writes: "For most of history, kids grew up in the dark intellectually. Right up until the mid-20th century, when television became widespread, the world outside their own neighborhoods was largely unknown to them, until they got to school. Today's kids grow up in the light. They're deeply immersed in it long before educators ever see them. Yet somehow schools have decided that all the light that surrounds kids-their electronic connections to the world--is somehow detrimental to their education." ... Check the article out in print: Turn on the lights. Educational Leadership 65 (6). pp. 40-45, or on several article aggregate databases.

HISTORICAL BASEBALL RESOURCES

The Library of Congress has recently launched a historical baseball resources web site. It includes many items that document the history of baseball and Americans' fascination with the game. Through photographs, personal accounts, official games guides, newspaper accounts, films, and memorabilia--including baseball cards dating from 1887--the Library's collections offer a first-hand look at the development of baseball in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Highlighted are select library resources on the popular sport, including player profiles, historical news and events, collection guides and presentations, and more. The multimedia web site also offers easy access to a sampling of visual images, including photographs of notable baseball figures and subjects. There are selections of audio and video presentations, such as web casts of lectures, as well as unique sound artifacts. Visit the LC site at www.loc.gov/topics/baseball/.

START WRITING THE EULOGIES FOR PRINT ENCYCLOPEDIAS

This New York Times article discusses the decline of print encyclopedias (sales are 10% of what they were in 1990) and the success of online versions. http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/16/weekinreview/16ncohen.html ?_r=1&oref=slogin.

EBSCO LAUNCHES FREE DATABASE: GREENFILE

EBSCO Publishing has made GreenFILE[TM], its bibliographic database of information about environmental concerns, freely available to users. Global warming, energy conservation, natural resources, and pollution are some of the topics covered in the database. GreenFILE covers content going back more than 35 years and contains bibliographic back files to volume one, issue one for Bioscience, Journal of Environmental Planning & Management, Journal of Ecology, and Conservation Biology. The site also contains bibliographic information for key non-scholarly titles such as E--The Environmental Magazine, Natural Life, and Mother Earth News. The database contains nearly 300,000 records, full text for certain titles and searchable cited references for more than 200 titles as well. For free access, visit www.greeninfoonline .com.

NOT YOUR GRANDMA'S LIBRARIAN

Share this article, "Meet Your New School Library Media Specialist" from the February 2008 issue of Scholastic Administrator with your school's principal. In it, author Eric Well writes: "As workstations replace dust-covered shelves in your district libraries, a new breed of librarian-the library media specialist (LMS)--has become an essential part of a school's faculty. These are the people who will integrate the digital world into today's classroom and throughout the curriculum. Specially trained and knowledgeable in the use of information technology, library media specialists have become one of the most important instructional partners, working with teachers and administrators to change what is possible in the classroom. …

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