After 82 Long Years, Maori Remains Leave Cardiff and Head Home to Be Laid to Rest; Wales' Curators Agree to Return Bones for Burial

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), November 16, 2009 | Go to article overview

After 82 Long Years, Maori Remains Leave Cardiff and Head Home to Be Laid to Rest; Wales' Curators Agree to Return Bones for Burial


Byline: Darren Devine

FOR more than 80 years the remains of a dozen Maoris have lain, not in their ancestral graveyards, but in storage boxes at Wales' National Museum.

But today those bones will begin a long journey back to their native soil, after curators at the museum agreed to return them to New Zealand so that they can be laid to rest.

The bones are thought to have been brought to Wales around a century ago after being obtained by aVictorian collector.They have been in the Cardiff museum's possession since it opened in 1927. Research suggests the specimens were originally brought from Ahuahu or Great Mercury Island, just off the New Zealand coast, and officials have now decided they should be returned out of respect for Maori spiritual beliefs.

Aspecial ceremony will be held at the Museum today to prepare 12 koiwi tangata (Maori ancestral remains) for their journey home. The remains consist of one largely complete woman's skeleton and skull bones from 11 other individuals. One of the skull bones is that of a woman, while five are from men. The sex of the remaining five cannot be determined.

The private repatriation was arranged by the museum in conjunction with the Museum of New Zealand - Te Papa Tongarewa.

Richard Brewer, keeper of archaeology at the National Museum, said little is known about how the remains, which have been confirmed as Polynesian, were brought from New Zealand to Wales. But it's thought Great Mercury Island, from where they are believed to have originated, was home to about five thousand Maori until 1800.

Mr Brewer said: "In the late 19th and early 20th century there were a lot of people travelling and collecting things from around the world.

"They were acquired by museums and you've got to remember in those days travel wasn't easy so things were brought to the public in museums rather than people travelling to see them."

Mr Brewer said the remains might have been "purchased" by a traveller from the local Maori or simply "discovered". …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

After 82 Long Years, Maori Remains Leave Cardiff and Head Home to Be Laid to Rest; Wales' Curators Agree to Return Bones for Burial
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.