Foreign Policy Address at the Council on Foreign Relations

By Clinton, Hillary Rodham | DISAM Journal, November 2009 | Go to article overview

Foreign Policy Address at the Council on Foreign Relations


Clinton, Hillary Rodham, DISAM Journal


[The following are excerpts from Secretary Clinton's address to the Council on Foreign Relations, Washington, D.C., July 15, 2009. The source document is from the Department of State web site: www.state.gov.]

Shortly before I started at the State Department, a former Secretary of State called me with this advice: "Don't try to do too much." And it seemed like a wise admonition, if only it were possible. But the international agenda today is unforgiving: two wars, conflict in the Middle East, ongoing threats of violent extremism and nuclear proliferation, global recession, climate change, hunger and disease, and a widening gap between the rich and the poor. All of these challenges affect America's security and prosperity, and they all threaten global stability and progress.

But they are not reason to despair about the future. The same forces that compound our problems-economic interdependence; open borders; and the speedy movement of information, capital, goods, services, and people--are also part of the solution. And with more states facing common challenges, we have the chance, and a profound responsibility, to exercise American leadership to solve problems in concert with others. That is the heart of America's mission in the world today.

Now, some see the rise of other nations and our economic troubles here at home as signs that American power has waned. Others simply don't trust us to lead; they view America as an unaccountable power, too quick to impose its will at the expense of their interests and our principles. But they are wrong.

The question is not whether our nation can or should lead, but how it will lead in the 21st century. Rigid ideologies and old formulas do not apply. We need a new mindset about how America will use its power to safeguard our nation, expand shared prosperity, and help more people in more places live up to their God-given potential.

President Obama has led us to think outside the usual boundaries. He has launched a new era of engagement based on common interests, shared values, and mutual respect. Going forward, capitalizing on America's unique strengths, we must advance those interests through partnership and promote universal values through the power of our example and the empowerment of people. In this way, we can forge the global consensus required to defeat the threats, manage the dangers, and seize the opportunities of the 21st century. America will always be a world leader as long as we remain true to our ideals and embrace strategies that match the times. So we will exercise American leadership to build partnerships and solve problems that no nation can solve on its own, and we will pursue policies to mobilize more partners and deliver results.

First, though, let me say that while the ideas that shape our foreign policy are critically important, this, for me, is not simply an intellectual exercise. For over sixteen years, I have had the chance, the privilege, really, to represent our country overseas as First Lady, as a senator, and now as Secretary of State. I have seen the following:

* Bellies of starving children

* Girls sold into human trafficking

* Men dying of treatable diseases

* Women denied the right to own property or vote

* Young people without schooling or jobs gripped by a sense of futility about their futures

I have also seen how hope, hard work, and ingenuity can overcome the longest of odds. And for almost 36 years, I have worked as an advocate for children, women, and families here at home. I've traveled across our country listening to everyday concerns of our citizens. I have met parents struggling to keep their jobs, pay their mortgages, cover their children's college tuitions, and afford healthcare.

And all that I have done and seen has convinced me that our foreign policy must produce results for people--the laid-off auto worker in Detroit whose future will depend on global economic recovery, the farmer or small business owner in the developing world whose lack of opportunity can drive political instability and economic stagnation, the families whose loved ones are risking their lives for our country in Iraq and Afghanistan and elsewhere, children in every land who deserve a brighter future. …

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