Security Assistance Accounting 'S Role in Enterprise Resource Planning

DISAM Journal, November 2009 | Go to article overview

Security Assistance Accounting 'S Role in Enterprise Resource Planning


[The following article is compliments of the DFAS-Indianapolis Center Security Assistance Accounting News Update, July 2009.]

What is an Enterprise Resource Planning?

An Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) is a company-wide computer system for managing all the resources, information, and functions a business performs. An ERP normally covers all business aspects like logistics, acquisition, finance, and accounting for an organization or business area. An ERP is more than just an accounting system replacement.

Now that we know what an ERP is, how does it relate to Security Assistance Accounting?

Well, this is an exciting and challenging time for Security Assistance Accounting (SAA) systems development. SAA is involved in all aspects of the future development and transition for our business into the future ERPs within the DoD. This is our opportunity to reshape, improve, and redefine foreign military sales (FMS) business processes and modernize our systems environment. We are truly charting a new course for FMS finance and accounting.

SAA's role in assisting with the new development includes gaining an understanding of FMS finance and accounting within DFAS, identifying weaknesses within our current processes and systems, leading projects identified to improve system issues, and redefining our business processes. SAA directly coordinates and interacts with the ERP Program Management Offices (PMO) and attends ERP workshops, teleconferences, and webinars representing DFAS Security Assistance Finance and Accounting Operations.

Our scope for involvement with the ERPs covers all areas within finance and accounting for SAA/FMS in DoD. Below is a list of the major on-going ERP initiatives SAA is involved with on a regular basis and some of the systems the ERPs will be replacing:

* Security Cooperation Enterprise Solution (SCES) replaces:

** FMS acquisition

** Logistics

* Financial functions from:

** Centralized Information System for International Logistics (CISIL)

** Management Information System for International Logistics (MISIL)

** Case Management Control System (CMCS)

** Defense Integrated Financial System (DIFS)

* Defense Enterprise Accounting and Management System (DEAMS) replaces finance and accounting functions of GAFS (General Accounting and Finance System)

* General Funds Enterprise Business System (GFEBS) replaces finance and accounting functions of Standard Financial System (STANFINS) and (Standard Operation and Maintenance Army Research and Development System (SOMARDS)

* Navy Enterprise Resource Planning (NAVY ERP) replaces finance and accounting functions for STARS (Standard Accounting and Reporting System). For Navy FMS, only the FMS administrative fund accounting will be in Navy ERE FMS case fund accounting is in MISIL

* Defense Agency Initiative (DAI) replaces finance and accounting functions for various Defense Agencies like Washington Headquarters Services Allotment Accounting Services (WAAS)

* Strategic Disbursing Initiative (SDI) centralizes disbursing functions from SRD1, CDS, and Data Distribution Service (DDS)

* Air Force--Training Control Financial System (TFS) to GAFS-BQ (General Accounting and Finance System Base Level) Conversion

In preparation for converting from a manual system to the current Air Force base-level accounting system, the Air Force Accounting Branch in Security Assistance Accounting is scheduled to convert from the Training Control System (TRACS) Financial System (TFS) to the General Accounting and Finance System Base Level (GAFS-BQ) in October 2009. This will realign the Air Force Security Assistance Training (AFSAT) accounting system with the rest of the Air Force network as we are currently utilizing a stand-alone system. TFS is a manually-driven system as most processes other than the automated tuition billing must be keypunched to update the system. …

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