Despite Recession, Eugene Education Grants on Target

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), November 16, 2009 | Go to article overview

Despite Recession, Eugene Education Grants on Target


Byline: Anne Williams The Register-Guard

Even in an ailing economy, the Eugene Education Fund's November grant-making tradition is alive and well - thriving, even - thanks to the reliable flow of community donations to local schools.

With its annual fundraising tally ahead of where it was at this point last year, the EEF last week announced 52 grants totaling $94,923 - one or more for every school - and three to fund districtwide programs.

The EEF has awarded grants to schools since 1994, the year after the nonprofit foundation was started.

Schools can submit up to two proposals for up to $500 each and two for $2,000 each, EEF executive director David Meredith said, and every school sent in at least one. Nineteen schools sent the maximum of four. Another 11 proposals came from district departments, such as health services and instruction.

Grant-funded projects range from classroom technology to theatrical productions to old-fashioned field trips. At Cesar Chavez Elementary, the only school to have all four of its proposals funded, EEF grants totaling $5,000 will pay for four or five field trips, new math materials, outdoor school, and school supplies for every student.

"Our families - they all work very, very hard, but many of them can't afford the school supplies," Principal Denisa Taylor said, noting that nearly 8 in 10 Chavez students are enrolled in the federal free and reduced-price meals program. "Kids need the supplies, and this is the first year we've found even more parents could not afford them because of their own stretched budget."

Taylor and her staff apply for the maximum number of grants every year, knowing the relatively small dollar amount makes a huge difference for students. While the school would cobble together the money regardless for some projects, including the school supplies, others simply wouldn't happen without the grants, Taylor said.

"We would not have been able to do outdoor school - we really could not have this year," she said of the overnight, nature-themed excursion for fourth- and fifth-graders. "There's really no extra funds."

Karen Olsen, a teacher at McCornack Elementary who leads an annual musical, said the $2,000 EEF grant will cover a majority of the elaborate production. This year, it will be "Willy Wonka."

"I think what probably appeals to the EEF folks is the musical/theatrical aspect to the grant," said Hansen. "There are so many really wonderful grants having to do with science and math and technology, but the arts is just such a dying breed, with so little support."

A panel of EEF board members and community members read each of the 136 proposals, assigning a score between 5 and 1. They tallied the scores and met on Nov. 2 to vote on an initial slate of 47 grants.

Between now and Dec. 31, more grants will be funded as dollars trickle in. Five additional grants have already been funded since Nov. 2, bringing the total to 52. The board prioritized the proposals, favoring schools with higher percentages of low-income students. Already, Meredith said, almost half the grant dollars are earmarked for the third of schools with the highest need.

Meredith said the EEF so far has taken in $712,017 in donations, ahead of the same time last year by $68,049. An Oct. 15 back-to-school gala was the most successful ever, drawing more than 200 attendees and raising $52,360. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Despite Recession, Eugene Education Grants on Target
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.