The Bloods V the Crypts; Cool, Smouldering Vampires Take on Twilight's Hot and Steamy Werewolves

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), November 19, 2009 | Go to article overview

The Bloods V the Crypts; Cool, Smouldering Vampires Take on Twilight's Hot and Steamy Werewolves


Byline: Rick Fulton

CATS and dogs, oil and water, vampires and werewolves - there are some things that just don't mix.

New film The Twilight Saga: New Moon sees the latest battle lines drawn in an age-old rivalry between the hot, clothes-ripping werewolves and the cool yet smouldering vampires.

Mere mortals have always had a fascination with the two monsters which capture our imagination but fill us with fear.

Tales of werewolves date back to Greek mythology and more modern incarnations like An American Werewolf in London, The Howling, Teen Wolf and even Michael Jackson in his Thriller video prove their enduring popularity.

Legends of blood-sucking demons also seem to have been around for eons. Excavated pottery shards from early civilisations in Persia show creatures attempting to drink blood from men.

Vampires have also featured heavily in films and television series. From the incredibly creepy rat-like Nosferatu in 1922 to Christopher Lee's legendary Dracula in 1958 - the first film to incorporate fangs, blood and red eyes - to more current films like Blade.

Vampires battling werewolves on film were first seen in the 1943 movie with Bela Lugosi, The Return of the Vampire, and also more recently in the 2003 film Underworld which starred Kate Beckinsale.

New Moon sees a vampire and a werewolf pitted against each other to win the love of human girl Bella Swan, played by Kristen Stewart. She is already smitten with vampire Edward Cullen, played by Robert Pattinson, who like the rest of the Cullen family has chosen to drink animal blood and not human blood, which means his eyes are amber not red.

Bella's best friend is Jacob Black, played by Taylor Lautner, a Native American who is a member of the Quileute tribe, who have always been mortal enemies of vampires. His people carry the latent werewolf gene.

When there aren't any vampires around, they live and die like normal people. But when vampires threaten them the rogue gene kicks in. In the second film of the saga Jacob becomes a werewolf for the first time, and along with his pack, saves Bella's life.

Bella has now been saved by both a vampire and a werewolf and there is hot debate on the internet on which team fans are on - Team Jacob or Team Edward.

Author of the Twilight books, Stephenie Meyer, tends to favour the werewolf.

She said: "The whole Team Jacob/Team Edward thing is based on the type of boy that an individual is interested in.

"If I were for a team, I'd say I'd probably be Team Jacob. That's more my style. If you believe that you can develop a deep friendship and then all of a sudden fall in love later on, then you should be Team Jacob. But if you believe in love at first sight and seeing that mysterious man in the corner, then all right, join Team Edward."

Director Chris Weitz claims the five werewolves - Jacob, pack leader Sam, Embry, Paul and Jared - are more of a fraternity than the vampire coven The Volturi.

He said: "They are a band of brothers whose job it is to protect their land and their tribe and even the people around them who don't necessarily understand what they're doing."

Chaske Spencer plays Sam Uley, the serene, self-assured leader of the pack. He took the lead on the set as well, earning the nickname "Alpha".

"As Sam, I felt like I had to take care of my boys," Spencer explained. "It was easy - we liked hanging out with each other on and off screen It was a real brotherhood."

Sam was the first to experience the transformation and he has had to guide the ones who followed. "His priority is to protect his people," said Spencer. …

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