The Dying Game: To Save Their Careers, Gay and Lesbian Celebrities Stayed Mum to the End. but in the End, It Didn't Matter

By Vaillancourt, Daniel | The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine), October 13, 1998 | Go to article overview

The Dying Game: To Save Their Careers, Gay and Lesbian Celebrities Stayed Mum to the End. but in the End, It Didn't Matter


Vaillancourt, Daniel, The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine)


TO SAVE THEIR CAREERS, GAY AND LESBIAN CELEBRITIES STAYED MUM TO THE END. BUT IN THE END, IT DIDN'T MATTER

Montgomery Clift: Beautiful Loser (Barney Hoskyns, Grove Weidenfeld, 1992)

Originally published in Great Britain, this book doesn't mince words. At one point in his unflinching rendering of the tormented star, Hoskyns writes, "In the summer of 1954...Monty rented a house up in Ogunquit, a Maine equivalent of Long Island's gay enclave Fire Island, and gave himself up to bouts of sadomasochistic sex with boys he picked up on the beach."

Alvin Ailey: A Life in Dance (Jennifer Dunning, Addison Wesley Longman, 1996)

Written by Dunning, a reporter and dance critic for The New York Times, this biography chronicles in excruciating detail the life and death (from AIDS-related complications at age 58 in 1989) of master dancer-choreographer Ailey. Its author never shies away from depicting her superbly talented subject's self-destructive excesses and dizzying self-deception. "At first I was not treating AIDS, only auxiliary problems," Dunning quotes private-duty nurse Anne McKnight as saying. `That was the dance we played.... He was furious I was trying to get him well. He was in such denial about his illness. But you see, I wanted him to live."

Always, Rachel: The Letters of Rachel Carson and Dorothy Freeman, 1952-1964 (Edited by Martha Freeman, Beacon Press, 1995)

The enduring, intimate correspondence between lauded author Carson (The Sea Around Us, Silent Spring) and her Maine summer neighbor Freeman was compiled by the latter's granddaughter. The sum is a tale of friendship for those who skim the surface, a love story for those willing to read between the lines. "What can I say to you tonight that has not been said before? Or that is not already in your heart? What new words are there to describe this beautiful experience we are sharing?" writes Carson in a Christmas Eve missive. "We both know that no new words are necessary--that the three simple words that were first said a trifle shyly in a pre-Christmas letter in 1953 still say all that need be said.... I love you, Rachel."

Babe: The Life and Legend of Babe Didrikson Zaharias (Susan E. Cayleff, University of Illinois Press, 1995)

The androgynous Olympian may not have fessed up about her lesbianism in her 1955 autobiography, This Life I've Led, but Babe's lover, fellow pro golfer Betty Dodd--who actually shared a Tampa, Fla., home with Babe and her husband, George Zaharias, near the end of Babe's life--goes on the record with Cayleff here. "I never wanted to be away from her even when she was dying of cancer," Dodd says. "I loved her. I would have done anything for her."

Barbara Jordan: The Biography (Austin Teutsch, Golden Touch Press, 1997)

"Neither of them realized at the time that their meeting would escalate into a relationship that would last almost twenty years," writes Teutsch in his reverent if perhaps overly imaginative biography of celebrated African-American politician Jordan, who died in 1996, and her life partner. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Dying Game: To Save Their Careers, Gay and Lesbian Celebrities Stayed Mum to the End. but in the End, It Didn't Matter
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.