The Advanced Criminal Investigation Course: An Innovative Approach to Detective In-Service Training

By Kiley, William P. | The FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, October 1998 | Go to article overview

The Advanced Criminal Investigation Course: An Innovative Approach to Detective In-Service Training


Kiley, William P., The FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin


Law enforcement administrators know that providing training for their personnel remains an important, yet oftentimes difficult, task. Offering advanced training to experienced personnel, such as detectives, proves troublesome because of their responsibilities and schedules. Traditional classroom-based training that requires officers to attend for several consecutive weeks can cause significant staff shortages that adversely affect a department's investigative operations. While scheduling conflicts, time constraints, and operational concerns impact even the most critical advanced-training needs, administrators can find alternate training methods that work within these confines.

ONE DEPARTMENT'S SOLUTION

The Suffolk County, New York, Police Department created an innovative and cost-effective in-service advanced-training program to address the needs of its experienced detectives. Of its 2,800 sworn members, over 500 are detectives or detective supervisors. Their assignments range from general investigations to specialized crimes, such as homicides, robberies, and arsons. All detectives have attended the department's required basic criminal investigation course, and many have completed courses and seminars in their areas of specialization. However, no organized, in-service training program existed for detectives assigned for many years to investigative work. The chief of detectives decided that the department should have an advanced criminal investigation course as an update for these seasoned detectives.

The overall vision for the new course required that it be informative, interesting, and, most important, a primarily hands-on, outside-the-classroom experience. Enrollment in the course would be totally voluntary, and participants would need a minimum of 3 years of service as detectives in addition to several years as patrol officers. With these basic concepts in mind, the staff of the detective division set out to develop a unique new training opportunity, the Advanced Criminal Investigation (ACI) course.

Curriculum Development

All levels of supervisors, teams of detectives, prosecutors, and representatives from the county's crime laboratory formed a committee and developed a list of possible topics for inclusion in the ACI course curriculum. They determined that some of the subjects proved germane to all detectives, while others would interest only a portion of the investigators. Therefore, the committee decided to use a college curriculum approach to the ACI course - some subjects would be core requirements and others would be electives. The ACI course includes required subjects, such as advanced forensics, electronic and physical surveillance, courtroom testimony, high-tech crimes, major case investigations, legal updates, as well as interview and interrogation. Training in criminal intelligence, advanced crime prevention, and interviewing child victims of sexual assault comprise some of the elective subjects. Volunteers for the course would receive a certificate of completion once they finished the required subjects and at least one elective course. Moreover, participants could take as many electives as they wanted based on space availability and scheduling arrangements.

Schedule Challenges

After determining the curriculum, it became evident that training of this scope would require significant time commitments from the participants. Additionally, a wide variety of work assignments and an austere overtime budget made scheduling ACI courses a challenge. Therefore, the department had to find a way to accomplish the training without adversely impacting its day-to-day operations and without expending overtime funds. To answer this challenge, the committee developed an ongoing schedule of the various training modules, which would be offered on dates coordinated with the detectives' diverse work schedules. For example, the electronic and physical surveillance module would be presented six times during the period of October through May each year on dates selected to coincide with the different duty rosters of the detectives. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Advanced Criminal Investigation Course: An Innovative Approach to Detective In-Service Training
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.