Francine Ward: Founder and Director, Esteemable Acts Institute Mill Valley, California

Talent Development, November 2009 | Go to article overview

Francine Ward: Founder and Director, Esteemable Acts Institute Mill Valley, California


[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Ward has many titles--intellectual property lawyer, breakthrough coach, motivational speaker, and author. Through the self-founded Esteemable Acts Institute, Ward helps clients build self-esteem through positive action. Her books include Esteemable Acts: 10 Actions for Building Real Self-Esteem and 52 Weeks of Esteemable Acts: A Guide to Right Living. She also frequently presents workshops and keynotes on gaining self-esteem, combating fear, handling intellectual property in the Internet age, changing oneself for the better, and acting to fulfill one's goals. Ward supports a number of service organizations, including the ASPCA, the Southern Poverty Law Center, The Innocence Project, the San Francisco Bar Volunteer Legal Services Program, and KIVA. The bulk of her pro bono efforts are with Marin Services for Women, a treatment facility.

Q| WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST JOB, AND WHAT LESSON DID YOU TAKE AWAY FROM IT?

When I was in the 10th grade at the High School of Art & Design in New York City, I talked a lot on the telephone. One day my mom got so tired of me running up the phone bill that she said, "If you're going to talk, you need to get your own phone." So I did. I got a part-time job across the street from my high school at the phone company, and was able to get my very first telephone. Two lessons came from that experience: that nothing was impossible-even though it felt like it in the moment--and if you really want something, you must work for it. That was the bottom line.

Q|WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON ACCOUNTABILITY AND GRATITUDE IN THE WORKPLACE?

It's honestly almost impossible to succeed in life as well as in the workplace without some sense of gratitude and without some sense of accountability.

Accountability is the ability to take responsibility for the part you play in your life-whether or not you like how your life looks. It's important because it's easy to blame someone else for your mistakes. If you're busy pointing the finger outward, you don't notice those three other fingers pointing back at you that would help you improve or change the condition that you don't like. I think a successful worker who could ultimately even become a successful leader has the courage to take responsibility for the things that he's done. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Francine Ward: Founder and Director, Esteemable Acts Institute Mill Valley, California
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.