Public-Sector Values

Marketing, December 2, 2009 | Go to article overview

Public-Sector Values


The COI wants to standardise the assessment of government ad campaigns.

Accountability is the watchword sweeping Whitehall departments as the government tries to tighten its belt in line with the tough economic climate.

The COI is attempting to take the initiative on this agenda, as shown by its publication last week of a report on financial effectiveness and efficiency in public-sector marketing.

The consultation paper, which is the first of its kind, sets out a 10-step blueprint. The aim is to help those in government communication roles determine 'sensible and robust' estimates of Payback - the financial benefit delivered by the marketing - and Return on Marketing Investment (ROMI) - the value of Payback delivered, less the cost of the marketing - for every pounds 1 spent.

Using the method detailed in the report, it claims that the 1998-2005 TDA teacher recruitment campaign not only paid for itself, but should provide returns of pounds 85 for every pounds 1 spent. The COI hopes that the document will become the definitive guide for public-sector communicators.

As the report, 'Payback and Return on Marketing Investment (ROMI) in the Private Sector', notes, this sort of thinking is a far cry from the days when the consensus was that the effects of advertising were 'too subtle, intangible and long-term to be subjected to anything as crude as a cost-benefit analysis'.

John Mayhead, the chairman of the government's Strategic Marketing Advisory Board, has detected a new mood at Whitehall. His group has tried to encourage government marketers to learn lessons from the private sector since its establishment early last year. He says he has found himself 'very much pushing at an open door'.

Mayhead, a former marketing director at Argos, puts this down to a change in personnel over the past 18 months. He says the Cabinet Office appointment of Matt Tee as the permanent secretary of government communications last year - he was previously the chief executive of NHS Direct - coupled with the 'new broom' of Mark Lund, the former chairman of ad agency DLKW, who was named chief executive of the COI in February, have been pivotal in driving the effectiveness agenda. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Public-Sector Values
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.