The Role of Colleges in Disaster Relief: Why and How Institutions Should Be More Involved

By Kittle, Daniel R. | University Business, November-December 2009 | Go to article overview

The Role of Colleges in Disaster Relief: Why and How Institutions Should Be More Involved


Kittle, Daniel R., University Business


WHEN THE CEDAR RIVER crested at over 19 feet in June 2008, hundreds of residents of Waverly, Iowa, were forced to evacuate their homes and seek shelter. The city, facing the most devastating natural disaster in the county's history, found much needed support and assistance from Wartburg College.

Sustaining only minor damage to campus, the college partnered with the American Red Cross to host the organization's disaster assistance center and shelter more than 50 displaced people for nearly a month. The college community responded with more than 15,000 hours of volunteer service, also contributing financially to fundraisers and benefit concerts. The college's Center for Community Engagement coordinated volunteer efforts and provided leadership in the creation and operation of the long-term community recovery coalition.

Unfortunately, our college's experience with natural disasters is far from unique. As we've seen in places like North Dakota, California, and Minnesota, natural disasters are a reality for which all campuses need to be prepared.

Yet until recently, preparation for most colleges has meant identifying ways they could secure themselves in response to disaster. While necessary, that is not enough. Colleges need to play a more significant role in the process of community-wide disaster preparedness and recovery. We have a particular set of strengths and assets that are well suited to assist, and sometimes lead, the disaster preparedness and relief processes. This engagement also is an opportunity for our students to participate and learn.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

COMMUNITY PARTNERS

Those in the business of disaster response have well-defined roles in the recovery process. For example, after our local first responders and the American Red Cross provided immediate security and relief, national disaster response organizations quickly came to our aid. Nechama, the Jewish community's disaster response organization, coordinated and assisted with the cleanup process. Lutheran Disaster Response provided a pool of regional and national volunteers. The Christian Reformed World Relief Committee conducted door-to-door assessments that estimated the unmet needs of those in our community.

While these organizations were providing the hands to get the work done in our community, the Federal Emergency Management Agency and our local disaster responders helped prepare for the lengthy road of recovery ahead.

The effectiveness of the recovery process hinges on one factor--quality, organized, local partners. Who can access local volunteers? Where are central meeting locations? Who are the leaders in the community, and who can bring them together? Who has demonstrated a long-term commitment to practices of justice? Who has the technical expertise to create systems for communication and coordination?

The disaster recovery process requires local partners that are organized, agile, responsive, and resourceful. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Role of Colleges in Disaster Relief: Why and How Institutions Should Be More Involved
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.