Justice Department Defends 'Faith-Based' Funding of Religious Organizations

Church & State, November 2009 | Go to article overview

Justice Department Defends 'Faith-Based' Funding of Religious Organizations


The U.S. Department of Justice has defended a series of Bush-era "faith-based" grants to sectarian organizations, but referred complaints from Americans United about the funding to the federal agency's monitoring and investigative units.

AU wrote to U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder June 24, asking him to terminate or investigate nine federal "earmark" grants awarded to faith-based groups that include large amounts of religious activities in their programs or discriminate in hiring on religious grounds.

The grants were awarded during the 2008 fiscal year under the administration of President George W. Bush. In its letter, AU asserted that the Justice Department approved the constitutionally dubious funding without conducting anything more than a cursory review of its legality.

In a letter of response to Americans United, Acting Assistant Attorney General Mary Lou Leary said that was not the case.

Leary said the Office of Justice Programs (OJP) scrutinized each grant applicant to make sure the funds will be used in a way that comports with constitutional requirements.

Wrote Leary, "Although organizations and their members are constitutionally guaranteed the right to the free exercise of their religious beliefs, grant-awarded funds from the Department may be used only for specific purposes, consistent with the statutory authorization for their appropriation, and those purposes are secular."

Americans United requested that grants to Albany Teen Challenge, Central Indiana Teen Challenge, Minnesota Teen Challenge, New Hope Academy Teen Challenge of Pennsylvania and the Detroit Rescue Mission Ministries be terminated entirely. It requested that grants to four other religious organizations be investigated to make certain the money is not spent to advance religion.

AU said many of the groups that received the public funds have track records of proselytizing and engaging in religious discrimination when hiring staff.

In its letter to Holder, Americans United included specific examples of problematic language from the organizations' Web sites and other materials. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Justice Department Defends 'Faith-Based' Funding of Religious Organizations
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.