911 Report from Neighbor That Person Is Suicidal Is Not Sufficient Basis for Police Officer to Seize Person for Emergency Mental Evaluation When Officer Observed Person and Saw Nothing Indicating a Danger to Self

Developments in Mental Health Law, July 2004 | Go to article overview

911 Report from Neighbor That Person Is Suicidal Is Not Sufficient Basis for Police Officer to Seize Person for Emergency Mental Evaluation When Officer Observed Person and Saw Nothing Indicating a Danger to Self


Riding his bike while intoxicated, a 41-year-old North Carolina man fell down in his neighbor's yard. The neighbor called 911, which led to a report to the police that he was intoxicated and had told his neighbor that he was depressed and going home to commit suicide. After returning home, the man was visited by a responding police officer.

Although disputed, there was evidence that the man invited the officer into the house, resumed eating his lunch at a dining room table, and in response to a series of questions denied any thoughts of suicide. There were no weapons or any other indications of preparations for a suicide attempt in view. After five minutes of questioning, the officer was apparently satisfied and the man asked the officer to leave, escorted him out of the house, and closed the front door.

As the first officer stepped onto the porch, a second officer arrived to whom the first officer may have said "we're going to have to do something." The second officer then knocked on the front door. After telling the second officer that the suicide report was "crazy," that the officers "need[ed] to leave," and that he was going to call his lawyer, the man attempted to close the door. The second officer grabbed the man's arm in an attempt to pull him onto the porch, a fight ensued, and in the course of being subdued the man was struck in the face multiple times, kicked in the back, handcuffed, and dragged by his feet to the curbside. Stitches and repeated surgeries were needed to repair the injuries the man incurred. The man sued the officers, arguing the officers did not have probable cause for an emergency mental health evaluation. The officers responded the neighbor's 911 report had established the needed probable cause.

The Fourth Circuit rejected the officers' assertion. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

911 Report from Neighbor That Person Is Suicidal Is Not Sufficient Basis for Police Officer to Seize Person for Emergency Mental Evaluation When Officer Observed Person and Saw Nothing Indicating a Danger to Self
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.