David Cameron

By McGuire, Stryker | Newsweek, January 4, 2010 | Go to article overview

David Cameron


McGuire, Stryker, Newsweek


Byline: Stryker McGuire

The 43-year-old leader of Britain's Conservative Party is on track to become the first Tory prime minister since 1997. Then the real work begins.

McGuire: What decisions would you take at the outset that would distinguish you from 13 years under Labour? Cameron: The war in Afghanistan has got to be fought, has got to be won. I would have a war cabinet from day one. The second thing is the deficit. Very rapidly, we [in a new government] will have an emergency deficit-reduction and growth budget. We cannot go on spending the way we are. I think the third area I'd pick out is what we believe is a more responsible country. We've covered our police, our teachers, our doctors, our nurses, our social workers in so much red tape and bureaucracy that they're incapable of fulfilling the vocation that drove them into their professions in the first place.

If elected, you will inherit one of the heaviest debt burdens in the world. How do you propose to reduce the deficit and still improve public services like schools and hospitals? We've got to break this idea that the only way of improving things is to spend money on them. You can actually get more for less. [But] we're not claiming that you can reduce the budget just by efficiencies. We've said there will be a public-sector pay freeze from 2011, excluding the million lowest-paid workers. We've said that the retirement age will rise.

You've said you want a relationship with America that is "solid but not slavish," which was interpreted as a dig at [former prime minister] Tony Blair. How did the Blair-Bush relationship harm the United Kingdom? Tony Blair wasn't positive enough in raising questions and issues [about the invasion of Iraq and postwar planning]. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

David Cameron
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.