Hearts and Minds: Steven Prevost FCMA Describes How a Voluntary Project to Write and Publish a Book of Short Stories and Poems Has Improved Morale among Staff at Lloyds Banking Group-While Also Raising Funds for the British Heart Foundation

By Prevost, Steven | Financial Management (UK), November-December 2009 | Go to article overview

Hearts and Minds: Steven Prevost FCMA Describes How a Voluntary Project to Write and Publish a Book of Short Stories and Poems Has Improved Morale among Staff at Lloyds Banking Group-While Also Raising Funds for the British Heart Foundation


Prevost, Steven, Financial Management (UK)


[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

I'd like to tell you a tale about bankers--bankers with a heart. Yes, you did read that correctly. I am senior manager of business intelligence at Lloyds Banking Group. My story is about how I came to suggest, organise and co-ordinate the publication of a volume of short stories and poems by employees at my company--raising money for charity along the way.

Over the past year employees at my company, like those in many other financial institutions, have endured the fall-out of the credit crunch--from daily headlines about the banking crisis and government bail-outs to the massive merger of Lloyds TSB with HBOS--and the insecurity it has caused. While all this was going on, I and a small group of colleagues embarked on a corporate social responsibility project to boost morale and benefit society at a time when it was a struggle to remain positive about our work. The takeover had created uncertainty about the heritage of both HBOS and Lloyds TSB, so everyone I spoke to was keen to be part of something positive and work together to make a difference.

We needed to apply our collective professional skills to finance, manage and deliver the project. Its main objective was to showcase the writing talent of our employees around the country, but another important goal was to generate income for the Lloyds Banking Group charity of the year, the British Heart Foundation.

All this began in late March 2009, when I discovered that a few people in my department had an interest in creative writing (I have been writing since 2004 and have had a few poems and a short story published). Several of these colleagues were interested in the idea of a collection, so I then asked contacts across the UK to suggest others in order that we could assemble a team.

I was careful to limit the number of contributors to ensure focus and minimise the time for delivery. We didn't want people to get involved and then to move somewhere else before the book was finished. We set a target maximum of 12 writers and allowed three months for them to prepare pieces for a first review. We chose the contributors carefully, selecting people who'd already had work published or who could provide evidence of their literary experience. They put their egos on the line when they offered to provide material for the book, which was intended to be sold both internally to their colleagues and externally to the public.

We knew that we could do only a minimum of work on the initiative during office hours and that the writers would have to prepare their submissions in their own time. But one added benefit was that the project brought together people from across the group to collaborate in a way that they would not ordinarily have done, so we all widened our networks.

Our main challenges were to establish:

* Sponsors. This project was a first for us, so we wanted a few people at senior level to back it. The main one was Philip Grant, COO of the wholesale division. His remit was to support the writers by ensuring funding and to provide the gravitas we needed to direct and promote the initiative.

* A steering committee. Our success hinged on knowing the right people with the right skills to get the job done. I've been with the organisation for ten years (first at Bank of Scotland and then at HBOS before the merger with Lloyds TSB). In this time I have led the finance side of strategic core banking system programmes and been the finance representative on a range of projects, so I've met a lot of people in the group. If I didn't know someone with the required skills, I knew someone who knew someone who had them. This was particularly useful when finding colleagues from other locations and functions. The committee covered finance, project management, marketing, communication and distribution. We all knew that we had to fulfil the tasks we'd volunteered for even when our day-jobs were particularly busy because of all the extra work imposed by the merger. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Hearts and Minds: Steven Prevost FCMA Describes How a Voluntary Project to Write and Publish a Book of Short Stories and Poems Has Improved Morale among Staff at Lloyds Banking Group-While Also Raising Funds for the British Heart Foundation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.