National Environmental Health Association

By Roberts, Welford C. | Journal of Environmental Health, January-February 2010 | Go to article overview

National Environmental Health Association


Roberts, Welford C., Journal of Environmental Health


October 15, 2009

The Honorable Barack Obama

President of the United States

The White House

Washington, DC 20500

Dear Mr. President:

On behalf of the National Environmental Health Association (NEHA) and the thousands of local environmental health professionals that we represent, I want to take this opportunity to contact you on a matter of urgent concern for our membership. This letter is to indicate our strong support for the public health and prevention provisions that were included in the final mark ups in the House Energy and Commerce Committee and Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee's health reform bills. The provisions of this legislation calling for the development of a National Prevention and Health Promotion Strategy, as well as the provisions establishing a Public Health Investment Fund are of particular interest to us.

Two key concepts that must be recognized and reflected in any legislation that emerges from Congress are commitments to strengthen the nation's public and environmental health infrastructure and to establish prevention as the central strategy in our health system. NEHA has joined many of the national public health organizations in endorsing these concepts. I am writing separately to reinforce our strong view that in the HELP committee mark-ups, the House Energy and Commerce bill, and in reconciling this legislation with the health care reform legislation coming out of the Finance Committee--the wellness and prevention provisions mentioned earlier remain intact. …

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