New Era Dawns in Naval Warfare

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 31, 2009 | Go to article overview

New Era Dawns in Naval Warfare


Byline: John Lockwood, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

When the CSS Virginia and the USS Monitor slugged it out at Hampton Roads, Va., on March 9, 1862, it was the first battle in history between ironclad ships, ending in a draw. Contrary to a still-widespread belief, however, they were not the first ironclad ships in history. The French, followed closely by their British rivals, had been building armored vessels first.

The French government of Emperor Napoleon III began experimenting with the idea in 1854 during the Crimean War, a conflict fought mostly along the shores of the Black Sea, with France, Britain and Turkey on one side and Russia on the other.

The French government built four ironclad artillery platforms, each protected by 5 inches of armor. The platforms were not true seagoing ships. They had to be towed into place before opening fire. The platforms first went into service in late 1855, not against Russian ships but against Russia's Kinbourn forts, and silenced them after a brief bombardment.

Ironically, one of the American officials sent to observe the war was Capt. George B. McClellan, who in 1861 would become the general in command of the Union's Army of the Potomac. McClellan wrote a 360-page book of his observations, but if he ever saw the platforms, he never mentioned them.

Encouraged by this success, the French government built the first true ironclad ship, the Gloire, in 1858. The Gloire also was protected by 5 inches of iron. The ship's armament consisted of 35 rifled cannons and a steel battering ram.

Almost immediately, the British responded with an ironclad ship of their own, the Warrior. Not surprisingly, the Warrior was a better-armed ship, with 48 guns. Its armor was also 5 inches thick. The Warrior may still be seen today, on display at Portsmouth, England.

In one respect, both the Gloire and the Warrior still clung to the past. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

New Era Dawns in Naval Warfare
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.