Editorial

By Henderson, Charles | Cross Currents, December 2009 | Go to article overview

Editorial


Henderson, Charles, Cross Currents


Editing Crosscurrents has never been more fun. This becomes evident to me when I put together the final issue in a volume year. As you may have noticed, this is the one that is not organized around a predetermined theme. The articles are received, read, evaluated, and sent out for peer review; sometimes they are subject to developmental editing, which involves communicating with the contributor. As the year progresses, we receive far more articles than we can possibly publish. Some need to be rejected simply for lack of sufficient space, some because the quality of thought or writing does not rise to a certain level. There are many reasons we may not be able to publish articles that others might find perfectly appropriate. In any case, long before the deadline for the winter issue arrives, we have a rather amazing lineup of articles that we would like to publish. From among these we might be able to select eight or nine for the final work of copy-editing and formatting as the text makes its way to the printed page. Yes! Print still lives.

What makes this interesting, however, in addition to the benefit of learning from our contributors' scholarship, are the unintended, unifying themes that emerge from this process which is otherwise so random. For example, this issue starts off with Curtis Freeman's "Alterity and Its Cure." This, from a Baptist, who explores the notion of otherness in the context of the differences he encounters with and within his own tradition. This is an autobiographical narrative written by a "recovering liberal," but it is also a mirror that reflects many of those crosscurrents at the interface of contemporary cultures and ancient traditions that this journal focuses upon. Writing from a still more autobiographical perspective, Carol Ochs describes the formation of her own "worldview," which she compares to a work of art. While she speaks from what is easily recognizable as her own Jewish background, the questions she raises are ones that readers of this journal will find themselves addressing again and again. …

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